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Thread: Cambered iron for jointing Edges

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
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    Tokyo, Japan
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    433
    Very nice indeed! Similar pieces have survived 300 years surely. Yours might need a few repairs after a few generations of children have climbed all over it, but it will still be something worthy of a very nice home.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Tokyo, Japan
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    433
    Quote Originally Posted by David Weaver View Post
    Maybe it's just a phase (for me), I hope my comments about it don't offend anyone.

    I think it's a product of overexposure to visible dovetails and finger joints.
    I was just yanking your chain, David. I think it is very gentile of you to keep your grain concealed.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    PA
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    11,277
    I do prefer to wear clothes that don't show my underwear or anything generally covered by underwear, too. It seems very similar to me. I don't want to be a furniture flasher.
    Unleaded tastes a little tangy, supreme is kinda sour, and diesel tastes pretty good.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Chevy Chase, Maryland
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    2,071
    Thank you both. We always hope the next will be better than the last. It's nice to be able to talk to fellow woodworkers, because friends and family just kind of stare at me blankly when I say things like "short grain." Stan, I hope you get some pics together. I would be interested. Have you ever done Tansu? I'm starting on a makeup vanity that has strains of Nakishima and elements of tansu. We shall see!

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
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    3,635
    Sean, I know I commented on that in another thread but again, it really is a lovely table. You somehow managed to find that oh so vary hard to find balance in having some very nice decorative details without it looking overly ornate or ostentatious. Its has some beautifully done turning a decorative touches, but it would look just as at home in a typical middle class home as it would in a wealthy estate. I think that's a very hard balance to achieve and I think you pulled it off perfectly.
    Woodworking is terrific for keeping in shape, but it's also a deadly serious killing system...

  6. #21
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    Mar 2009
    Location
    Chevy Chase, Maryland
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    2,071
    Chris, you are crazy ... but very nice. I agree that it can be difficult to strike a balance on decorative elements. I'm certain I'm still learning. I think the hobbiest has a tough time, because it takes so long to build even one piece, and you probably need to build originals at least three times to get to an iteration that really satisfies you on all fronts, and of course, you'd rather build something else.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
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    3,635
    Quote Originally Posted by Sean Hughto View Post
    Chris, you are crazy ... but very nice. I agree that it can be difficult to strike a balance on decorative elements. I'm certain I'm still learning. I think the hobbiest has a tough time, because it takes so long to build even one piece, and you probably need to build originals at least three times to get to an iteration that really satisfies you on all fronts, and of course, you'd rather build something else.
    I feel ya on all counts. And yes, I am crazy.... still a nice piece though. I like pieces that have some nice decorative elements but that I can still envision in my own home. That's why Zachs recent piece got me turned onto W&M stuff... its got nice decorative elements, but it wouldn't look out of place in my house. I think I've mentioned before that I really like that Southern style furniture book that Glenn Huey put out a year or so ago too, for that same reason. I'm sure there are elements of the execution you're not happy with (this is always the case), but give yourself some credit for designing something that has both taste and originality to it.
    Woodworking is terrific for keeping in shape, but it's also a deadly serious killing system...

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