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Thread: Miter plane question (attention Rob Lee....lol)

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia.
    Posts
    88
    It's probably too late in the design stage to change, but if somehow you could design a double grip that could be pushed by righties and pulled by lefties, you could avoid two models. The traditionalist lefties might be mortified, but if they were really traditionalist they would have been forces to learn tools right handed. :P

  2. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Babbage View Post
    It's probably too late in the design stage to change, but if somehow you could design a double grip that could be pushed by righties and pulled by lefties, you could avoid two models. The traditionalist lefties might be mortified, but if they were really traditionalist they would have been forces to learn tools right handed. :P
    Hmm... that sounds like a right-handers solution....

    We also explored a double blade/double handle solution, and didn't like it....

    No.... we'll either do it the right way, or not at all.

    Better be a lot of left-handed mitre-shooting people out there though...!

    Cheers -

    Rob

  3. #18
    ahhh man that really sux - I had inoculated myself from the LN 51 lust by convincing myself that there is no way I would get enough use to justify 500$ - LV comes up with something as good or better, esp with PM-V11 blade at a "get 'em off the fence" intro price and I am toast.... hello my name is Erik and I have a tool acquisition addition

  4. #19
    Ooooo I'm excited now!! I've looked at the ln mitre plane and loved it until I saw the price and thought, that's a luxury I can live without especially with my bevel up jack plane. This will be on my wish list for sure. I love LV tools more than any because not only are they high quality, but I love the ingenuity that goes into the products. For example: LN thinks, "how can we take a Stanley #5 and make it the highest quality #5 (when it's still just a really nice Stanley bedrock) and then LV thinks "how can we take a Stanley #5 and improve upon it to make it work better and easier for people to use." I like that!

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Las Vegas, NV
    Posts
    458
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Lee View Post
    Hmm... that sounds like a right-handers solution....

    We also explored a double blade/double handle solution, and didn't like it....

    No.... we'll either do it the right way, or not at all.

    Better be a lot of left-handed mitre-shooting people out there though...!

    Cheers -

    Rob
    And for thinking of me and my ilk, you retain a customer for life, AND sell one of these planes!


    daniel ( gauche)
    Not all chemicals are bad. Without hydrogen or oxygen, for example, there would be no way to make water, a vital ingredient in beer.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    3,282
    Rob, will you be offering a 52 as well - the sled?
    Where did I put that tape measure...

  7. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Herrmann View Post
    Rob, will you be offering a 52 as well - the sled?
    Hi Gary -

    No plans to at the moment... but will not rule it out...

    Cheers -

    Rob

  8. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Lee View Post
    Hi -

    Not a lot I can really say right now, other than it will be a good "other" choice for you folks.

    We'll be doing a few things differently than Stanley did. At the moment, we have only a right hand body on order, but I'm being heavily lobbied by left-handers for a version there too. Pricing should be in the $300-$400 range... possibly with a "get 'em off the fence" intro price..... .

    It has been designed to be used for both shooting and jointing ....

    Cheers -

    Rob
    Any chance we'll be able to see the new plane at the wooden boat show at the end of June?

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    2,850
    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Null View Post
    I have been lusting over the LN miter plane for a while now. I am getting close to actually ordering one, when I saw the post on the LV that is in the works. Does anyone have any info on the LV version that is supposed to be out later this year?
    Tim - A comment about miter planes. I've used (and own) a lot of different solutions, all the way from traditional British-design wooden "strike-block" planes to the Stanely-design planes through to high-end British infill mitres. All of them have different usage characteristics.

    One thing I've noted is that the Stanely-design #51 is more difficult for me to use than the strike-block/Stanley-design #9/British infill mitres. The reason is where the plane is gripped. Taking a Stanley-design #9 as an example, I use the "hot-dog" grip, and the force of the planing stroke (and the downward force on the shooting board) is all registered very close to the cutting edge. With the #51, the grip is quite a long ways back from the cutting edge, at least if the rear tote is used to grip the plane.

    The #51 works very well in softwoods and the softer hardwoods like tulip poplar, but even with the incredible heft of the L-N version, I find it more difficult to get a consistent end-grain shaving off of the harder domestic hardwoods like cherry, maple and walnut.

    In my opinion, the "ultimate" miter plane is a large-size British design infill skewed miter. But using such a plane in the shop gives me the willies, because they're very valuable, either purchased as a newly-made plane from a modern infill maker or an antique. And I have a concrete floor.

    So - I find more use for the L-N version of the Stanely #9 as a shooting plane than any other in my possession. It is very versatile - because it doesn't have a skew blade, it can be used on a shooting board in both right-handed and left-handed configurations. That is sometimes very handy, though not totally necessary.

    Food for thought, and just one man's $0.02.

  10. #25
    Hi David

    What is the cutting angle of the infill skewed mitre plane to which you refer? If it has a 20 degree bed (likely), the cutting angle will not be lower that 45 degrees. The LN #51 has a 45 degree cutting angle and a 20 degree skew.

    You may be interested in the comparison I made between the LN #9, LN #51, and LV LAJ. The results may surprise you.

    http://www.inthewoodshop.com/Furnitu...sCompared.html

    One way to improve a shooting board's performance is to make the plane as stable as possible. The #51 gets a good part of its performance from the stability imparted by the #52 shooting board. To create this on any shooting board, you need to add a running fence ..

    http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ShopMad...tingBoard.html

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  11. #26
    I completely agree with this. I've used all three L-N varietals for shooting: the 62 jack, the 9 mitre, and the 51 shoot. Whatever the 51 loses in skew angle (and it's not much, all three should be able to produce polished end grain if sharpened properly), it more than makes up in ergonomic happiness. the running fence is key, and it should be mounted with slotted holes to make up for differental wear from use.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    3,583
    My opinion should be taken with a grain of salt (in general, but especially here), but when I used them at shows I actually liked the no 9 better then 51 as well. I love shooting with my LV LA jack, but I must say the no. 9 is darn comfortable to grip. The 51 while remarkable in performance, felt awkward to me. That said, the No. 9 is essentially a standard bench/block plane designed for shooting, whereas the 51 is whole different animal. Given that I'm used to shooting with my LA Jack it makes sense that the No. 9, being more similar and thus more familiar, would initially feel more comfortable to me than the 51. My guess is that once one gets used to using the 51 anything else seems a bit weenie. That said, if I were going to buy one or the other, I'd probably plump for the no. 9... I just like it better. I'm not going to though, as I'm perfectly happy shooting with my LA Jack (though I wish Rob would make me a hotdog, as I've thus far been too lazy to make my own). I must also admit though, I am looking forward to seeing what Rob and his cronies come up with...
    Last edited by Chris Griggs; 02-11-2013 at 9:21 AM.
    Woodworking is terrific for keeping in shape, but it's also a deadly serious killing system...

  13. #28
    My guess is that ...

    Hi Chris

    If you read my article (above) you will discover that the LV LA Jack has the potential to out plane the #9, and that it can also be more comfortable and controllable than the #9 without a hotdog if you follow my handhold suggestion.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    598
    Don't you need a left and a right hand version when mitering heavilly profiled pictureframes? Otherwise you must make a complicated support to be be able to mitre the offhand one on a righthanded shootingboard.

    Not that I really know, because I never miter pictureframes, just something I was thinking about.

  15. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Kees Heiden View Post
    Don't you need a left and a right hand version when mitering heavilly profiled pictureframes? Otherwise you must make a complicated support to be be able to mitre the offhand one on a righthanded shootingboard.

    Not that I really know, because I never miter pictureframes, just something I was thinking about.
    If you miter picture frames that much, you probably already have a dedicated guillotine for it.

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