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Thread: Advise needed: going from 1.5hp Dust Collector to 1.5hp Cyclone

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Los Angeles, CA
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    32

    Advise needed: going from 1.5hp Dust Collector to 1.5hp Cyclone

    Currently I have the highly rated Delta 50-760, and although it works well, I am tired of moving the hose from machine to machine and will instead be installing permanent "plumbing" to each machine.

    At the same time, I am going to upgrade to a cyclone machine and have narrowed it down to the G0443 1.5hp. Grizzly Cyclone, but when I look at the numbers my Delta is 1200CFM, and the Grizzly is 1025CFM. . .so will I miss the extra CFM?

    Is there anything out there with higher CFM, or a better cyclone option that will run on 110V? I really wish I could upgrade to 220V for the DC but, it is not an option, so from what I see I am stuck with 1.5hp.

    FYI: I will need it to collect dust from Table Saw (12' away), Bandsaw(7' away), Planer(5' away), 25" Drum Sander(5' away), and assorted small tools 12'-18' from DC. Only using one tool at a time.

    Will the cyclone cover it, or am I going to be swimming in dust?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    WNY
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    1000 CFM is plenty for one machine at a time. There are a of lot sources of info. for the CFM needed for each machine; here's one: http://www.americanfurnituredsgn.com...ll%20Shops.htm

    John

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    Central WI
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    The problem is you won't get near the 1000 cfm rating and probably don't get 1200 from the bagger. If you can live without the cyclone I'd put a bigger bag on the delta and run it with the duct work. No cyclone saves at least 2" SP and the bigger bag will help as well. That might translate into a better flow than what you have now with the flex. Dave

  4. #4
    John, your 1.5 hp will probably work well for the tools other than the sander. Sanders are hard to collect all the dust from. I have a 2hp cyclone, and wish I had gone 3 hp. Most of the tools work great, just the sanders are the worst to try to get all the dust. Some is probably the design, as when I had a Woodmaster 718 it was hard to collect all the chips from, but since I got a Grizzly 453 that problem has gone away. Someday maybe the mfgrs might look harder at a way to do a better job of collecting the dust, and improve the collecting. Some must have, because the planer works great. Hardly can find a chip after planing a bunch of boards.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
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    Camas, WA 98607
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    If you could vent outside (many people can not, for reasons of heat loss in the shop, or neighbors too close), I think the cyclone could serve you.

    I would consider fixed smooth wall ducting (such as s&d pvc avoiding the static pressure loss of corrugated hose) with homemade self-cleaning blast gates (which can be made full duct size, avoiding the choking of store-bought gates) and venting the cyclone exhaust air outside (to avoid the static pressure losses of the filters). The cyclone will remove almost all of the chips and dust, leaving negligible fine dust to blow outside and preserving most of your cfm.

    When we use less than a 3 hp blower, it is in our interest to take advantage of every incremental improvement that we can make.

    I would then add one or more homemade air-cleaners to filter the ambient air in the shop.

    Lornie

  6. #6
    Dan,

    I just finished installing a Grizzly G0703 1-1/2 hp cyclone in my basement, I am very impressed with the performance and I'm confident that is will capture most of the dust from my machines. We have a couple of Jet 1-1/2 baggers that we use at work occasionally and the G0703 seems to just suck A LOT more than those do. Since the G0443 specs indicate better #'s than the 0703, I think it will be sufficient for your configuration. As others have mentioned, if any machine is going to be a problem it's going to be the drum sander, since it makes dust rather than chips and may have an inefficient hood design you may not capture all of the dust from that one. Design your pipe runs to minimize static pressure and you shouldn't be swimming in dust.
    Kevin Groenke


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Hebron, KY
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    Regarding the "small tools", and depending on what they are, I would consider collecting from them with shop vac type arrangement and leave them off of the cyclone.

    The longer run will add SP and the neck down to the small ports if these are benchtop is a killer. It might be doable if you run a 6" duct over, then branch it multiple times to the 2-1/2" or 1-1/4" ports. You would want to run all the small ports open at the same time, otherwise your flow will be less than adequate.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
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    Kevin,

    Just took a look at your shop (amazing!), and if the G0703 is working for you, then I should have no problem with the G0443 since my space is about the same size. I figured the drum sander would be the major problem, and it it becomes unmanageable I can always wheel it outside.

  9. #9
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    Apr 2012
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
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    Can someone elaborate on venting outside and not using the filter. . .is it as simple as cutting a hole in the wall and sticking pipe through it? Would there need to be any type of collection at the other end, or just blowing in the breeze? I am in Southern California, so no worries about my heating bill. The only concern would be about possible noise. Am I right to assume that the end sticking outside would be one of the loudest components of the entire setup?

    Thanks,
    Dan

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Hood Canal, Washington
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    I vent outside. I don't find the outside part to be very loud--not nearly as loud as the actual DC inside the shop. To make a comparison, it's about as loud as a clothes dryer.

    With a good cyclone, you shouldn't get much debris coming out of the exhaust pipe at all. If you let your chip barrel overfill however, all bets are off.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Camas, WA 98607
    Posts
    135
    Hi Dan

    My first attempt to vent outside used a 6" metal duct, and I felt it howled too much for me to be a good neighbor. I then bought a length of 10 inch interior diameter flexible heating duct, and now my exterior vent is 'dryer vent' quiet.

    FOIL FLEX DUCT.jpg

    I did not agonize over an expensive fitting to connect 6" to 10"..... duct tape has been working just fine!!!

    The idea for flexible heating duct used as a silencer came from Bill Pentz website. I recommend you read it all. Twice!

    Lornie

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