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Thread: Zinsser spray shellac?

  1. #1

    Zinsser spray shellac?

    I've gotten my butt in a bind on a finishing schedule for a wedding gift. I've either run out of or misplaced my blonde dewaxed shellac flakes. I seem to remember the Zinsser spray is also dewaxed. That is all I have access to locally. They also sell Deft, but have never used it as anything other than a finish coat.

    Fwiw, the project is a walnut Butler's Tray Table. I usually apply a coat of darker shellac (done), dark grain filler (done), a couple of coats of blonde shellac, then my finish coat which I would like to rub out.

  2. #2
    The Zinsser spray will be perfect for that. You won't need more than a single coat to serve as a barrier between the grain filler and top coat. However, do you even require a barrier between the grain filler and your top coat?

  3. #3
    Thanks, probably not on the barrier coat, but that is how I was shown how to do it and I know what I am getting.

  4. #4
    I believe the Zinsser dewaxed shellac is marked as "Sanding sealer" but in small print it says "dewaxed shellac".

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Henderson View Post
    I believe the Zinsser dewaxed shellac is marked as "Sanding sealer" but in small print it says "dewaxed shellac".

    Mike
    That is correct, and I have used it in the past. I need something tonight and the aerosol is all I can find locally.

  6. #6
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    I'm pretty sure the spray shellac contains wax, though the woodwhisperer did some experiment related to this.
    Worth checking out.
    To understand recursion, one must first understand recursion

  7. #7
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    Zinsser Sealcoat Shellac is dewaxed; says so on the front of the can. I believe their rattle can spray shellac also is dewaxed, but can't say for sure.

    John

  8. #8
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    I'm looking at a spray can of Zinsser Bulls Eye Shellac as I type this. From the back of the can it says "Because spray shellac is 100% wax free it can be used as a sealer under polyurethane or other finishes".
    Wood'N'Scout

  9. #9
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    >>>> I'm pretty sure the spray shellac contains wax,

    No, the Zinsser Spray Can shellac is 100% dewaxed. Wax would clog up the spray nozzle.

    I am a little confused about whether the OP's top coat is going to be shellac or some other finish. I would not use a shellac as a top coat on something that could have adult drinks spilled on it.
    Howie.........

  10. Howard, thanks. I'm using an alkyd varnish as the finish coat, the Benjamin Moore fast drying product that has been discontinued. The project is a Butler's Tray Table that is a wedding gift. I got the table sprayed with the shellac and added a coat of varnish before I went to bed. So far so good.

    The store here doesn't have anything else except poly, but has a few cans of the alkyd varnish remaining in stock. (I probably should have bought all they had, but the guy wouldn't come off his price.) I have used a solvent based lacquer in the past, but do not have the products or equipment with me. I guess I could have bypassed the shellac stage, since I am using varnish, but that is what I know. I'm no expert but the old guy who showed me how to finish walnut and mahogany did some beautiful work. He started with a 4-5# cut of amber or dark shellac (I can't even drag a brush thru that soup, so I usually apply 2-3 coats of a 1-2# cut) after he'd colored the wood if needed. Then he went to the filler, shellac, and finish, usually 3-4 coats of lacquer. I like the look with the filled grain on most pieces, and it sure looks a lot better than the old poly over Minwax stain I used to use.

  11. #11
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    I'm sure it will be very nice.

    It's unfortunate that non-poly varnishes have just about disappeared from the shelves. The only two I know of are Pratt & Lambert #38 and Waterlox Original. Both are excellent and I hope they stay around. The VOC police are spreading an ever widening net.
    Howie.........

  12. #12
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    Sherwin Williams still has their Classic Fast Dry Oil Varnish an alkyd resin/linseed oil varnish.

    This varnish does not work well as a wiping varnish... for some reason it tends to drag a bit if you try to wipe it on. After a few days a wipe-on coat is OK and doesn't drag; but 24 hours or less seems to still drag.
    Scott

    Finishing is an 'Art & a Science'. Actually, it is a process. You must understand the properties and tendencies of the finish you are using. You must know the proper steps and techniques, then you must execute them properly.

  13. #13
    The VOC police have gotten even Waterlox. IMHO, it's the VOC restrictions on solvents - not the resins that's the bigger tragedy.

    FWIW, poly has some virtues. For wiped on applications, it's very forgiving; it has less initial odor, and is very compatible with mineral spirits for thinning. For objects that don't require a thick coat, poly can be made to look top notch. I know at least two of this country's premier woodworkers that used poly in their in-the-wood finishes.

    Also, some of the bigbox commercial spar varnishes (Cabots, Ace) still use phenolic resins (it's unclear if it's uniquely phenolic, but it is at least a component).

  14. #14
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    Phenolic resin varnishes are UV stable that's why they use phenolic in the quality exterior varnishes. OTC urethane resin varnishes are easily damaged by UV. Exterior varnishes (long oil) are softer and less water resistent than interior (short oil) varnishes.
    Scott

    Finishing is an 'Art & a Science'. Actually, it is a process. You must understand the properties and tendencies of the finish you are using. You must know the proper steps and techniques, then you must execute them properly.

  15. #15
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    The problem with "spar" varnishes is that spar varnish is formulated to be quite soft so it can remain adhered with climate changes causing movement in the underlying wood. This softness makes them susceptible to easy damage..

    Spar varnish is not a good choice for interior applications. In addition, its high oil content causes spar varnish to less water and moisture resistant than an interior rated varnish.
    Howie.........

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