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Thread: Yates American jointer (at auction)

  1. #1
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    Yates American jointer (at auction)

    No affiliation or connection to this auction company in my local area but thought I'd share as I know some of you guys like these huge classic machines.

    6137_4587792.jpg

    Yates No 1 American Plainer
    > 7 Ft 3 in Long
    > 2 Ft 8 in Wide
    > 3 Ft 4.5 in High
    Last edited by Keith Outten; 06-22-2013 at 3:08 PM.

  2. #2
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    Nice machine. From the looks of the motor and table length would guess pre WW2. Guard is not original and is a patternmakers jointer which tended to get less use. Probably why the tables are in good condition. You can see the planing marks all the way across the table. Can't tell how wide the head is though. It is the American design and looks to be from right after Yates bought out American. Dave

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Kumm View Post
    Nice machine. From the looks of the motor and table length would guess pre WW2. Guard is not original and is a patternmakers jointer which tended to get less use. Probably why the tables are in good condition. You can see the planing marks all the way across the table. Can't tell how wide the head is though. It is the American design and looks to be from right after Yates bought out American. Dave
    Thanks Dave, I don't know much (if anything) about these old machines but sure do appreciate the build quality and history of them.

  4. #4
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    Old jointers are among the best deals in machinery. Fairly simple machines. All about the quality of the cutterhead and cast iron. If not abused the tables are generally more flat and straight than new until you get into the 10K + territory. You can swap out the heads but the originals are so good that it isn't common. Dave

  5. #5
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    Unless this is a special order and build machine, I'd have to respectfully disagree with Mr. Kumm on the labeling of this being a pattern makers jointer. For clarification, a pattern makers jointer is distinct for the single following reason: the infeed table tilts side to side on curved trunnions so that the machine can cut material with a taper across the width, called "draft" in foundry and pattern shop speak- so cores can release after casting. I have not seen another American made jointer with this feature other than the Oliver 12-B, unless its successor the 166 had it in some fashion with a prefix or suffix . There probably are others, but I don't know of them.
    People have mistaken the "spring joint lever" on the out feed bed as the mark of a pattern makers jointer for probably a hundred years, but this is just not so.
    That is however a very low use machine, judging by the condition/ crispness of the planer marks on the bed from when it left the factory.
    I sometimes wonder if the term "patternmaker's jointer" wasn't started by some used machinery dealer long ago to "enhance" the value of a particular machine for sale, and maybe it worked and so stuck?
    Peter

  6. #6
    I have no doubt Peter is right.But I also refer to the ones with the lever as "pattern makers " model. The lever also makes it easy to get tables coplaner .Ive only seen one of the side tilting models and it is in a pattern making shop.

  7. #7
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    Peter is absolutely correct. I've fallen into the habit- as have others- in labeling spring joint machines as patternmakers. Still wrong, no excuse. I think a few companies marketed them that way but Yates did not. Northfield made a true patternmakers jointer but not particularly well loved. The Oliver 12 was the pick of the litter. Porter put the spring joint on the infeed which was pretty nice although I keep mine locked down to avoid getting it out of whack. Most others adjusted the outfeed. I've also incorrectly gotten to call old machines in nice condition patternmakers machines as the nice ones seem to come from there or from schools. Dave

  8. #8
    I think some of it does come from the mfgs having "lines" " suitable for pattern makers " with varying features. Ive read so many discussions about what is and is not a "slick" that I just use "giant chisels".That way I can irritate all parties.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Kumm View Post
    Old jointers are among the best deals in machinery.
    Completely agree; I had a 1950s Northfield that gave me great service for 25 years but always liked the idea of getting an Oliver someday.

    The photo might exaggerate things, but the fence on this Yates jointer seems particularly long.

  10. #10
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    Frank,
    The fence on these is very generous compared to most - approximately 6" tall x about 5' long. I have the pre-Yates model, labeled American - 1920's era. Probably the best and most copied jointer design ever, courtesy of Frank Clement back in the late 1800's still used today by the likes of Northfield and others, no wonder it was called "the perfection jointer"

  11. #11
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    Thanks for the follow up, Peter.

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