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Thread: Hanging Cabinet Doors to Spray, Ideas?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Greenville, SC
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    750

    Hanging Cabinet Doors to Spray, Ideas?

    Any body have any better ideas for a hanger to hold cabinet doors with Euro Hinges while I spray them? I got this idea online using a large fishing hook.



    There is also the Fastcap or Rockler tools...





    I have 10 doors to lacquer tomorrow. Was looking for some ideas! Fish hooks seems pretty easy or just putting screws in the hinge holes in the door with a piece of string would work too...

    Ben

  2. #2
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    Jan 2013
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    Keezletown, VA
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    The fishing hook looks like it should work. I spray mine laying flat on a board with 4 nails propping it up so I can flip them and do the other side. Do you have to spray them hanging?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    Redwood City, CA
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    I spray with an HVLP. I tried hanging doors, but it didn't work very well. The sprayer puts out so much air that it blows the door around. I'd be steadying the door with one hand and spraying with the other, so I'd get finish on the steadying hand. Then, when I went to spray the other face, there'd be no place I could put the steadying hand without messing up the already-sprayed face. And, you have to let the doors hang while they're curing, so you can't use the spray area to work on anything else -- like the casework. I went back to laying the doors down flat. I spray one face, let the finish dry, then do the other face. Each door gets moved from the spray area to a drying rack, so the spray area can be used to spray the rest of the project.

  4. #4
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    Mar 2003
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    Monroe, MI
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    Yeah, don't

    I spray one side, put them in my drying rack, let it dry, then flip. With WB products the dry time is fast and I can just about spray the second side of the first one right after the first side of the last one. If you are painting that might be a different story.

    The other advantage of flat is that you are less likely to get runs.


  5. #5
    I use nail boards. Spray the back, then flip the door onto the nails and spray the front. Hanging is a technique for large scale produtions where the doors are actually moved in and out of the spray area on hooks. Hanging doesn't help much when all you have is 20 doors which would fit on any old drying rack. Spraying flat is also more forgiving for less than perfect technique.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    Monroe, MI
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnny means View Post
    Spraying flat is also more forgiving for less than perfect technique.
    Hey wait! What are you saying?


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    Ottawa, ON Canada
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    I was about to +1 on Matt's advice to lay them flat until Johnny implied that my spray technique was less than stellar. :-) :-)
    Grant
    Ottawa ON

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Greenville, SC
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    Thanks for the feedback guys.

    I am spraying pigmented lacquer on the cabinets doors I built for our laundry room. This will be my first go at doing doors, wanted to make sure that I had my technique correct!

    As much as I got invested in the lacquer, I didn't want to screw anything up...

    Ben

  9. #9
    what matt said = spray them flat - despite the cheap shot from the peanut gallery about technique . to me it not about technique - you need a certain minimum coating thickness to have the finish flow & level - that thickness depends on the material being sprayed, the finish & ambient conditions (how long to flow before it starts to dry & setup). by spraying flat you can err on the side of a thicker coat without risk of runs. the best thing I have for finishing is a cheap lazy susan I got from the BORG years ago - i installed a base and top set of rails on it with some drywall screws evenly protruding with dulled points - it is really easy to spray from all 4 sides without dancing around and tripping over the HVLP hose - plus the sprayer is always pointed where I want it to be to minimize the impact of overspray

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    Lewiston, Idaho
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    24,015
    You can make "nail boards". I took some scrap 1/2 " plywood, ripped it into 3" by 3" pieces and drove a small nail through the middle. I don't spray but rather brush and use them to finish doors and drawers.
    Ken

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Austin, TX
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    Agreed: "Flat" is easier when you are technique-challenged (like me, LOL...). I use these plastic pyramid-thingies from Lowe's...

    painterspyramid1.jpg

    Best of luck,

    Erik Loza
    Minimax USA

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Grand Forks, ND
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    I screw 2 small j-hooks into the bottom of the door, then use a heavy duty coat hanger on the hooks. Pickup the door with the hanger and spray both sides, hang on a rack with the hanger to dry. Works great, the 2 small holes are not visible (bottom side of the door on lowers, top side of the doors on uppers).
    A bus station is where a bus stops. A train station is where a train stops. My desk is a work station.

  13. #13
    HEY! I wasn't trying to imply anything about anyone's technique. Just stating that spraying flat makes the job a little easier allowing for a smoother work flow. Unfortunately, the bulk of my panels are too large to spray flat and I see plenty of errors due to the difficulty of spraying vertically. IFO, relish the ease of spraying onto a horizontal surface.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    I don't have no technique, but I do have nail boards. Pretty quick to make with ply scraps and a 16G brad gun. Don't use brads too long though, they fold too easy.

    Rick Potter

  15. #15
    I recently sprayed a lot of cabinet doors with Enduro Var. I used the plastic pyramids to do the spraying then moved them to another area to dry. I found having the doors laying flat produced no drip marks. One door was for a corner unit and was glued up at 90 degrees. The vertical section had drip marks and took the dye with it. I had to remake the entire door, and that was the most complex of all the doors.

    The hanging idea looks great but I'll stick with laying them flat.

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