Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 24

Thread: Best Casters For Concrete Floors?

  1. #1

    Question Best Casters For Concrete Floors?

    I'm looking to replace some really crummy casters on some cabinets in my shop. The floor is concrete. The cabinets are heavy.

    I was thinking rubber wheels wouldn't be the best option because the weight would flatten the bottom of the wheel when it sits for too long.

    Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Southern MD
    Posts
    75
    Depends. If your floor is very level and clean steel works, but it's very unforgiving of irregularaties, so you'd need to have a very smooth clean floor to make rolling easy.

    Most Rubber wheels are fine -just get them sized up for the weight. Most people under-size to save a few bucks. If you are very concerned about them taking a set, you can phenolic wheels, which roll somewhere between steel and rubber.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Richardson, Texas
    Posts
    150
    Julie,
    I've gone with Polyurethane and have been pleased. I have some cracks and these work well maneuvering over them.
    Jay

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    57
    I like polyurethane casters. These work well and are cheap.

    http://www.grizzly.com/products/3-Re...l-Caster/D2607

  5. #5
    I've seen the polyurethane wheels in a number of catalogs. I just don't know if they compress like rubber. The floor has no cracks and is level but stuff always falls to the floor, but it can be swept up. The biggest issue is flat spots. The casters I have now are like that, and they are too small. So I am looking to upsize to 4" or 5" wheels. Just not sure which I'd need. But as long as the wheels won't develop flat spots after sitting a while, I'll be happy.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    919
    Julie, I installed some poly-tired casters (Harbor Freight, most likely...) under a few wire shelving units and every tire developed a flat spot. On the other hand, I installed some large casters with hard plastic wheels (also Harbor Freight) under a very heavy cabinet and they have been fine. The poly deforms, in my experience. I would stick with either hard plastic or metal casters for shop cabinets and machines. Just my 2-cents.

    Erik Loza
    Minimax USA

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Mid Michigan
    Posts
    317
    I've been using Wagner's from Reid Supply for years now, they have a urethane wheel and don't flat spot (even under my Unisaw). Also, the total lock version locks up nice and tight with no wobble. IIRC, I think I've got 5 machines on them.

    http://www.reidsupply.com/online-cat...ret=sku/WC-73/

    I use the WC-73 & WC-75 part numbers.

    Ed

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    257
    I've been using those red ones from Woodcraft for years (the better ones, not the house brand). I think they are urethane wheels, no problems with flat spots. I tend to look for casters with good bearings more than wheel material. Most of my machines are old, so I don't really know the weights, in the 300-600 pound range at a guess. Using 4 casters rated at 400# each guarantees smooth operation. If you're buying a 400# rated caster, the wheel won't develop a flat spot, and it will roll and swivel nicely.

    I recently bought a 1300# machine, not sure what I'm going to do about that yet

    EDIT: I just went and looked, those ones I'm thinking of are rated 300# not 400. Principle of over doing it on the load rating still holds though, load the casters way under what they are supposed to take, and you get nice smooth operation. Four casters rated at 100# each might work for a cabinet saw, but in my experience it ends up being like a 400# shopping cart!
    Last edited by John Downey; 11-01-2013 at 4:46 PM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Columbia, MD
    Posts
    10,855
    Blog Entries
    1
    Polyurethane, Julie... can't go wrong. I have several on the cabinet that my CNC sits atop... no flat spots whatsoever after a couple of years. All equipment I made after that (another roll-around cabinet for my lathe supplies) use the same wheels. As said earlier, though, size them appropriately for the weight you intend to put on them.
    Hi-Tec Designs, LLC -- Owner (and self-proclaimed LED guru )

    Trotec 80W Speedy 300 laser w/everything
    CAMaster Stinger CNC (25" x 36" x 5")
    USCutter 24" LaserPoint Vinyl Cutter
    Jet JWBS-18QT-3 18", 3HP bandsaw
    Robust Beauty 25"x52" wood lathe w/everything
    Jet BD-920W 9"x20" metal lathe
    Delta 18-900L 18" drill press

    Flame Polisher (ooooh, FIRE!)
    Freeware: InkScape, Paint.NET, DoubleCAD XT
    Paidware: Wacom Intuos4 (Large), CorelDRAW X5

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Camas, Wa
    Posts
    2,216
    +1 on the ones from Woodcraft. They go on sale 3 or 4 times a year.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Tampa Bay, FL
    Posts
    1,177
    Quote Originally Posted by Cary Falk View Post
    +1 on the ones from Woodcraft. They go on sale 3 or 4 times a year.
    +1. And couldn't agree more about the oversizing them plan. Has always worked well for me.
    "If you think you can, or think you can't, you're right." --Henry Ford

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,604
    One consideration in selecting casters: virtually all "flat" floors aren't as a caster sees it. With four casters on a rigid base, even when evenly loaded, when you roll it there will be times when most of the weight will be on 2 casters in opposite corners.

    That's why many caster vendors tell you to size each caster for half of the total weight.

    Just my $0.02.. YMMV.

    Jim
    One can never have too many planes and chisels... or so I'm learning!!

  13. #13
    Looks like polyurethane is the way to go. Thanks for all your help! Now it's time to start looking for sales.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    697
    Quote Originally Posted by Julie Moriarty View Post
    Looks like polyurethane is the way to go. Thanks for all your help! Now it's time to start looking for sales.
    Quite often the sale price at a place like Woodcraft is the regular price at a caster mfg.

    I get mine here:

    https://www.sescasters.com/scripts/i...rface=products

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Bethesda, Maryland
    Posts
    208

    Where to go for casters.

    Quote Originally Posted by Julie Moriarty View Post
    Looks like polyurethane is the way to go. Thanks for all your help! Now it's time to start looking for sales.
    Sales are good, good advice is even better. You will find excellent advice for your specific needs at Caster City. I've been very pleased with their advice and casters.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •