Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 20

Thread: Drill Press Laser Guide

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Florida's Space Coast
    Posts
    389

    Drill Press Laser Guide

    Does anyone use a laser guide on your drill press?
    I had one on my Craftsman Drill Press and liked it.

    I know have a Delta Bench Top Drill Press and would like to add the laser pointers.

    I have found these 2:

    http://www.infinitytools.com/Drill-P...tinfo/100-144/

    http://www.performancetoolcenter.com...r-drill-press/
    Steve Kinnaird
    Florida's Space Coast
    Have built things from wood for years, will finally have a shop setup by Sept. 2015 !! OK, maybe by February LOL

  2. #2
    A classic fugazi.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    River Falls WI
    Posts
    460
    For the price the General tool one looks like it would be worth a try. Infinity Tool though has been a good company with quality products. Let us know which you choose. Dan

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto Ontario
    Posts
    10,901
    Hi Steve, I find they're not accurate enough.

    I use an awl to locate the center point on wood...............Rod.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Haubstadt (Evansville), Indiana
    Posts
    1,276
    Rod is somewhat right. Some of the pointers I have used the cross is not 90 degrees. What happens with these is the spot moves as you approach the drill point. Those with 90 cross are fairly accurate. Mine came with my Craftsman and does work well. I thought I needed/wanted a laser to be more accurate. Having said that I haven't turned mine on in years. Just not really worth it.
    When working I had more money than time. In retirement I have more time than money. Love the time, miss the money.

  6. #6
    I have one on my old Craftsman and it works ok, I don't use it to be real accurate, I use it to get close and then I have a punch mark to put the drill bit into.

    Now if you really want to drill a hole very accurate you can get one of these from Lee Valley, I have one and use it a lot when I need to drill a hole spot on.
    http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/pag...at=1,180,42311

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Florida's Space Coast
    Posts
    389
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Huber View Post
    I have one on my old Craftsman and it works ok, I don't use it to be real accurate, I use it to get close and then I have a punch mark to put the drill bit into.

    Now if you really want to drill a hole very accurate you can get one of these from Lee Valley, I have one and use it a lot when I need to drill a hole spot on.
    http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/pag...at=1,180,42311
    Neat punch, could see adding that in the future.
    To be accurate I believe that the lasers need to be fixed and not travel with the drill chuck.
    I order the General to play with. But not sure it will do what I want.
    Steve Kinnaird
    Florida's Space Coast
    Have built things from wood for years, will finally have a shop setup by Sept. 2015 !! OK, maybe by February LOL

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Mount Vernon, Ohio
    Posts
    168
    I have this one and have no complaints. It does exactly what it's designed to do after carefully setting it up and getting the adjustments made. And it does work throughout the table height range since it mounts to the column, not the spindle as some seem to think. I use everytime I use my drill press. Sometimes I just use the crosshairs on a rule to set the fence and/or stop blocks. Works perfectly.
    Do like you always do,,,,,get what you always get!!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    1,353
    My Craftsman has one on it.

    Kind of a gimmick--but when it went out I took it in for repair.

    I do use mine for an approximation.

    The thing Bill shows is cool, but a center finder in the chuck and center punch will so it also.

    Roger, I don't see how something mounted to the column can accurately find the center @ different table heights. The planes of the laser beams come from the mounting and go down toward the table at an angle, right? Not 90* to the up and down of your table....
    David
    Confidence: That feeling you get before fully understanding a situation (Anonymous)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    21,814
    Blog Entries
    1
    If you liked using one, the finer the beam the better. I have never found one where the beam wasn't wider than the degree of accuracy I require ;-)
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Valparaiso In
    Posts
    156
    Here's a video showing a laser centering device, but you will have to make it yourself. Starts at 2:10

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=otSjut1iGGk

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hayes, Virginia
    Posts
    14,400
    This Laser Center is held in the drill chuck. I use mine on my CNC Router and my Mill/Drill. The laser spot is adjustable all the way down to a diameter less then a pin.

    http://www.lasercenteredgefinder.com/main.html

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    'over here' - Ireland
    Posts
    2,532
    A lot tends to depend on how accurately you need to place your hole centres, but i'm another that figures the line on the crossed line laser markers may be thick enough to only be useful for maybe +/- 1mm accuracy. Which is fine for certain types of woodwork. Total runout on the drill adds to any inaccuracy - it doesn't seem to be hard to find 0.050in and more runout on many drill presses.

    That laser center looks interesting Keith, do you think it gets within the claimed 1/2 thou or so? (thinking of my mill drill - it should be faster than a wobbler/wiggler) The DIY angled laser method too Don - versatile and very smart, but dependent on the bore in the mounting and the machine part it's mounted on being accurately centred. Wondering how he gets high accuracy with such a thick laser line?

    I find i do quite well on wood using a simple centre point mounted in the chuck like this one - usually over knifed lines at 90 deg to each other under very good light as it's harder to position accurately over a punch or awl mark. http://www.leevalley.com/en/Wood/pag...at=1,180,42311 One place where having a long quill travel helps ease changing back to a drill. Twist drills (brad points are not so bad - touch the point very lightly to mark and check the setting before starting to drill) are very tough to centre over a mark - it takes a very good eye to even get close. Smaller sizes flex easily anyway, and will deflect to centre in a punch mark - producing who knows what result. A short and stiff engineering centre drill gets over this if needed. (less of an issue on wood)

    It's possible to use solid or adjustable parallels (accurately sized pieces of ground steel used for milling sets ups which can be combined to hit most dimensions not too expensive from hobby machining places: http://www.warco.co.uk/2938-parallels ) position a drill press fence accurately from a chuck mounted accurately ground cylindrical dowel pin of known diameter - Pat W describes the technique in his drilling manual. Parallels are also useful to scribe lines locating holes a set distance from the edge of a part - shown in the video below.

    More accuracy entails heading into traditional manual machine shop marking out techniques, and methods that may entail some calculation (offsets for tips etc) to fix dimensions. Keith's laser is in this space, i've been using the traditional wobbler/edge finder on a mill drill to find part edges or fix hole centres - again shown in action in the video linked below (and other places on YouTube etc): http://www.starrett.com/metrology/pr...r-Finders/827B Sometimes this one: http://www.amazon.com/Starrett-S828H.../dp/B0006J4PIS

    Guess beyond that it's often into machine tools with the ability to locate defined co-ordinates and dimensions using CNC or very accurate lead screw systems on XY tables.


    This MIT workshop training video does a nice job of covering quite a few standard/traditional engineering marking and layout techniques, including the above: http://techtv.mit.edu/videos/142-machine-shop-1



    Last edited by ian maybury; 10-01-2015 at 6:58 AM.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Mount Vernon, Ohio
    Posts
    168
    Quote Originally Posted by David Ragan View Post
    Roger, I don't see how something mounted to the column can accurately find the center @ different table heights. The planes of the laser beams come from the mounting and go down toward the table at an angle, right? Not 90* to the up and down of your table....
    I don't understand the mechanics (electronics?) behind it but, the beams of light somehow are vertical? All I know is that I thought the original that was on my drill press showed promise although it had to be re-calibrated after changing the table height. But, after talking with the guy at the Peachtree display at the woodworking show a couple years ago, I bought theirs' and have been totally happy with it ever since.
    Do like you always do,,,,,get what you always get!!

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hayes, Virginia
    Posts
    14,400
    I believe the laser center edge finder is the most accurate available because it mounts in the chuck. Whether it is capable of a half thousandths accuracy is probably based on the accuracy of your drill CIR.

    On my CNC Router I use the laser to setup multiple phases in a job when the sign is larger than my router table. I can setup match marks and slide the material using the laser to register the material for subsequent machining steps. If I have a power outage during a long machining run I can use the laser to go back to a selected point on the job and restart the cutting file.

    On my mill /drill the laser is much more accurate than my eyes are when I need to setup on a punch mark or scribe lines. Blue Dykem provides an excellent contrast to the laser beam and improves accuracy significantly when the spot size is reduced to less then a pin diameter.
    .

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •