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Thread: Those proud of their workshops, please post pics!

  1. #1

    Those proud of their workshops, please post pics!

    I'll finally be non-nomadic, and I'd like to finally build up a workshop.
    Before I get started, I'd love to get ideas.

    I'd love to see how you do things, and how you do things differently with all the disciplines here: tuners, neanders, power tool users, festoolies, etc.

    For those of you who are proud of your workshops, can you share pictures of your workshop?
    Also, can you write up a little blurb behind why you decided what you did, and what(if any) you'd change.

    -Matt

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Mountainburg, AR
    Posts
    3,034
    Blog Entries
    2
    Here is a link to a tour of my shop I did in 2010. It was all cleaned up then and I have only made a few additions since then.
    https://get.google.com/albumarchive/...ocd6Nb0kZHUiIY

    I hope the link still works.
    Larry J Browning
    There are 10 kinds of people in this world; Those who understand binary and those who don't.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    376
    20160611_111825_resized.jpg

    Here's my shop. I wouldn't say I'm "proud" of it but it serves me well with the space I have to work with. My shop is a 2.5 car garage, things are laid out in a way that I can still fit 1 car in it when I'm not working on a project. TS, jointer and planer are all on one side. All machines facing the same direction to allow cutting and milling 8' long material. Miter saw station on the other side against the wall and everything else is pushed back towards the front wall. I'm sure others can do much more with the space that I have but I like to have open space when working so I tend to spread my tools apart.

    I'm currently building a new house with a 1600 sq. ft. basement and the wife has agreed to not touch that space and let me have it as my dedicated work shop. I'm still planning out the space with many design changes in the works.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    In the foothills of the Sandia Mountains
    Posts
    13,795
    Here's a YouTube video tour of my 2 car garage shop. I have downsized a couple of machines and added a CNC router. Not much else has changed.

    Bruce's Woodshop Tour (or how to put 10 pounds of stuff in a 5 pound bag)
    Please help support the Creek.
    If you want the rainbow, you got to put up with the rain. - Steven Wright

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    3,294
    Not as much "proud" of my shop as extremely grateful for it. My shop is mostly too messy to photograph at the moment but I have a few photos, posted here in the past.

    I made areas for office, turning, flat wood, wood storage, electronics, microscopes, welding and metal working, machining, and farm and vehicle maintenance. Big doors. Big air compressor with plumbed air lines. Big cyclone for dust collection. Big copper underground for power.

    Turning.
    I use the shop a lot for woodturning. Lathe lighting is extremely important to me. I turn more small things than large so I like the lathes up against the walls for instant access to things. I often have people come to learn.

    lathe_PM_IMG_20160331_18501.jpg lathe_wall_IMG_20160323_122.jpg lights_IMG_20160811_092917_.jpg Girls_IMG_20150804_121948_936_lathes.jpg

    Little machine shop.
    Hate to be without it.

    mill_lathe_IMG_0605.jpg

    I recommend building your shop next to your llamas. What, you don't have llamas? You can fix that.

    shop_llamas_IMG_20150422_08.jpg shop_floorplan.jpg

    My shop is multi-purpose, designed and built myself from the dirt up. I tell people I built it with my bare hands but I lie, I used tools.

    My advice: plan, plan, plan, plan. I planned for over a year and drew dozens of drawings, revised and revised. Before I dug the footers I had the spaces planned and the tentative wiring, air lines, lighting, dust collector ducts, and HVAC layouts. I revised the electrical diagrams at least 6 times. I made models to fit the major tools, walking space, windows, doorways. Make it bigger than you think you will need. Run more power to it than you think you will need. Don't forget a sink and an ethernet line.

    JKJ

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    41,456
    Dated, but...



    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #7
    Thanks guys!

    I have to work on some kids now. I'll be back after taking care of them.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    NY State
    Posts
    266
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Lau View Post
    I'll finally be non-nomadic, and I'd like to finally build up a workshop.
    Before I get started, I'd love to get ideas.

    I'd love to see how you do things, and how you do things differently with all the disciplines here: tuners, neanders, power tool users, festoolies, etc.

    For those of you who are proud of your workshops, can you share pictures of your workshop?
    Also, can you write up a little blurb behind why you decided what you did, and what(if any) you'd change.

    -Matt
    It's always interesting to see other peoples shops. It would be most helpful if we had a separate area where shop tours could be kept. Any chance of that happening, moderators?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Houston, Texas area
    Posts
    627
    My virtual shop. We were supposed to break ground last month. I have a few more permitting problems to resolve. Hopefully we will be breaking ground around Oct 1st,... The steel and plastic for the slab are already onsite.

    8-27 shop left loaded up.jpgshop lights overehead.jpg
    Mark McFarlane

  10. #10
    A sticky would be great!

    I'm still putting together mine.
    I'll have two parts-- one is my bedroom, an incognito shop (yes, I'm single. )
    The other is the power tool shop--a garage on a rental with some power tools.

    The incognito shop will be pretty interesting, as it's designed to be inobtrusive but capable.
    I just bought some door racks from the container store to hold my titebond, hide glue, japanese saws, screwdriver, etc.

    Since I build guitars mainly, I don't need a roubo or a super huge table saw.
    However, a fully equipped shop would be awesome.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    28
    Good evening everyone. Here are some recent pictures of my shop. I built it in 2006. If I was to do anything different it would be larger. It is currently 840 sq. ft.
    DSCN1876.jpgDSCN1884.jpgDSCN1887.jpgDSCN1888.jpg

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    241
    Dated photos but my workshop has not changed a lot...

    Whats in my workshop:
    Robland NX410 combination machine: Wasnt going to spend mega $$$ on a Felder or SCM, but needed a full size combi that has 16inch planer. The Robland offers Tersa cutter block. I will never go back to traditional knives.

    SCM S400P (MM16): Got this as part of a deal with the Masterwood mortiser, I have not used the ripping on my combi ever since I got my band saw.

    Masterwood OMB1V: The OMB1V is capable to chisel out a large chunk of mortise in 10 seconds.

    Omga AL129: double mitre saw, controlled pneumatically, because of this saw I have sold my mitre saw. very very efficient if you have lots of same size to cut.

    SCM 5RCS1100: Wide belt sander is so versatile, all shop should have one, bigger the better. my sander is hooked up to the Danfoss VTL2800 Variable Speed Drive. the reason for this is to limit the inrush current as I only have 63amp supply.

    Chicago Pneumatics CPRS10500 + Ceccato drier and pre/post filter: the compressor is 10hp with 500 litre tank. Its absolutely vital to have your compressed air clean and dry.

    Festool Domino 700 and Pneumatic sander: got several Festool toys. these two are the one that I use most often.

    Extractor: Holytek DC006 Baghouse on 300mm opening

    Ducting: Danish JKF lip lock ducting.

    Storage for timber: I have a separate shipping container for the timber.

    What I dont have in my workshop:
    A work bench
    A lathe
    A spray booth
    A dremel
    A Tormek grinder

    Arriving soon (in November):
    Felder F700Z: Although its sounds good to have a spindle moulder as part of the combination machine, in reality its not that effective/efficient if you are in the production. setting up on the spindle moulder takes 90% of the time. you really need a stand alone spindle moulder if you are in a semi production shop or if you make a lot of same things over and over.


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    Last edited by Albert Lee; 10-03-2016 at 6:50 PM.

  13. Trevor's Workshop

    20160907_025156.jpg20160907_025723.jpg20160907_025731.jpg20160907_025912.jpg20160907_025946.jpg20160907_025952.jpg

    I'm prowd of my workshop. Only thing missing in the pic is my 12" Hitachi Sliding Miter Saw. Which goes in miter saw station.

    I'm trying to find a good program to layout my shop with all my tools on the computer. I've been using the one on grizzly's website, but its too limited and Sketchup is to complicated lol. Anyone no of a good program?

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    3,294
    Quote Originally Posted by Trevor OBrion View Post
    I'm trying to find a good program to layout my shop with all my tools on the computer. I've been using the one on grizzly's website, but its too limited and Sketchup is to complicated lol. Anyone no of a good program?
    Trevor,

    When I designed my shop and before I built it I did numerous shop floorplan layouts both to fit things and to plan the lighting and wiring. Although I retired from a career with expertise in technical 3D modeling I used a more efficient media - paper and pencil and scissors and tape! Once I decided on the building dimensions and room divisions I took a large sheet of paper and made scale cutouts for each tool, workbench, etc. My piece of paper was over 24" wide for the 24"x62" building so the scale was easy, 1"=1'.

    I moved the cutouts around until I was happy with the layout (including cutouts for infeed and outfeed spaces and spacing for walking and moving things) then taped them down. For walking space between tools I did an actual size mockup with a couple of large cardboard boxes to get a feel for the minimum walking space, then make a circle cutout of that distance and "walked" it through my paper layout.

    After I finalized the layout I measured for receptacle and light fixture placement. No surprises.

    All this was very quick and far simpler than using the computer.

    JKJ

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    41,456
    Like John, I've played with software in the past for "shop layout", but found "playing with cutout dolls of tools" to be much more effective in figuring things out. There's something pleasing with the tactile feel of moving playing pieces around the board, if you will, and then once it appears to be workable, commit to software for a "plan".
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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