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Thread: Cherry shoe cabinet

  1. #1
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    Apr 2008
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    Cherry shoe cabinet

    I started this project a while ago but only spend some of the weekends on it. It is supposed to be a shoe cabinet.
    I usually have a sketch of what I want to build on the paper with a few rough dimensions and go from there. For the first time I'm building without any drawing or plan written (everything is in my head).
    I wanted to have bowed raised panel doors. I wanted to get a vacuum press to try but never got around to order the parts and build it (maybe for the next time).
    The project started with selecting some curly Cherry:

    sc1.jpg

    Then setup my bandsaw to resaw them to make bent laminations:

    sc2.jpgsc3.jpgsc5.jpg

    Then make some "ribs" to make a form for the bent lamination. The male/female parts are to have a 3/4" gap (thickness of the panel):

    sc6.jpgsc7.jpgsc8.jpgsc9.jpg

  2. #2
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    sc10.jpg

    A plywood to make the form a then riddled with staples:

    sc11.jpg

    Add a layer of vinyl to protect against glue. To do the clamping I've placed a 1/8" thick piece in the middle under the 2x4 so that when I clamp down I have downward pressured at the ends of the 2x4's as well as the middle.

    sc12.jpgsc13.jpgsc14.jpgsc15.jpgsc16.jpg


    All the parts are made. The parts for the door frame are made bigger so that two pieces are made from one. I found it would be easier to run a taller piece on the shaper than shorter ones.
    Here is the setup to do the curved pieces on the shaper:

    sc17.jpg

  3. #3
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    sc18.jpg

    All the door frame parts are now shaped:

    sc19.jpg

    I re-enforce the miter joints with 8x70mm dominos:

    sc20.jpgsc21.jpg

    To raise the panels I used a vertical panel raiser bit:

    sc22.jpgsc23.jpgsc24.jpgsc25.jpg


    Still have to do the grooves in the frame to receive the panel, then glue everything up. Making these two doors has taken waaaay longer than I thought.
    If I was going to do it again I would use a different method instead of bent lamination (solid pieces glued and then bow the panel with a router setup like for planing a bench-top).

  4. #4
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    Here is the setup to do the raised panels and do the grooves in the frame for the panel:

    sc26.jpg

    The glue-up of the doors went well. Initially I had planed to use the form to clamp them using a band clamp (and strapping the door to the form) but it was very cumbersome and difficult to do (glaUsing those large dominos at the miter joints allowed me to clamp them like a regular door.

    sc29.jpgsc30.jpgsc31.jpg


    In order to make a rebate on the back of the panel made this little jointer out of my trim router. That piece of wood is a cut-off from the frame piece that has the same curve as the panel.
    I add a few layers of tape to one side:

    sc27.jpgsc28.jpg

    Making two half posts; use a piece of paper in between the glue-up to be able to separate the two after it is turned:

    sc42.jpgsc43.jpg

  5. #5
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    sc44.jpgsc32.jpgsc33.jpgsc34.jpg

    Made a template to make the top/bottom.

    sc35.jpgsc37.jpg

    Same template is used to profile the edge using a molding bit. This is the base of the cabinet:

    sc38.jpg

  6. #6
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    All the pieces are ready to assemble (doors, the top with inlay and the two sides). It's very difficult assembly with all the non-square angles involved....

    sc39.jpgsc40.jpgsc41.jpg

  7. #7
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    Beautiful work Mreza. I always enjoy seeing your process and the finished piece.
    Please help support the Creek.

    If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something. - Steven Wright

  8. #8
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    Marvelous I love it. Miters on curved pieces very cool.
    Thanks for sharing your work.
    Aj

  9. #9
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    Thanks Bruce/Andrew.

  10. #10
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    Thanks for posting the build progress. I hope you don't mind if I borrow that router table wheeled guide device in the photos. Looks real handy for curved work.

  11. #11
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    I guess you wanted to do a simple project this time around. Seriously, very nice work and very interesting project!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #12
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    Mike, you are welcome to use that idea and change as you like.
    Thanks Jim, someone else too mentioned that next time I should try something a little challenging ;-)

  13. #13
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    No one can accuse you of not embracing challenge, that's for sure!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #14
    That is some beautiful cherry on the door. I cannot wait to see it finished. That cabinet is too nice to put shoes in, though...

    I'm impressed with the thoroughness of your router set up. That curved fence very elegant.
    Last edited by Prashun Patel; 11-30-2016 at 11:09 AM.

  15. #15
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    Gluing the pillars to the sides, domino is very helpful in clamping these odd angles:

    sc45.jpgsc46.jpg

    Next step is to make a rebate on the back for the back to set in:

    sc47.jpgsc48.jpg

    Then make some feet, sorry I didn't take many photos of this stage, I use 10x50 dominos at the joints:

    sc49.jpg

    And here it is dry fit:

    sc50.jpgsc51.jpg

    Still have to do lots of sanding and also fit the shelves. Looks like I need to add a support in the middle as the top/bottom do sag a little under pressure and that causes problems with
    the very small gap between the doors. The doors are inset at an angle and that was a HUGE pain to get the distances right for installation of hinges!

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