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Thread: Repairing Hand Plane Tote Question

  1. #1
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    Repairing Hand Plane Tote Question

    Hi guys looking for a little help. I am repairing a few totes for some old hand planes. The dilemma is this, I have a couple where the whole top end will have to be replaced. I will need to re-drill the hole for the rod through the new section of wood starting from the bottom existing hole. The problem comes when trying to center the counter sunk area for the brass nut. Any suggestions. The perfect solution would be a 29/64 forstner with an unfluted 9/32 pilot to center it. I know I know… good luck with that. Ideas? How have you guys solved this?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark R Webster View Post
    Hi guys looking for a little help. I am repairing a few totes for some old hand planes. The dilemma is this, I have a couple where the whole top end will have to be replaced. I will need to re-drill the hole for the rod through the new section of wood starting from the bottom existing hole. The problem comes when trying to center the counter sunk area for the brass nut. Any suggestions. The perfect solution would be a 29/64 forstner with an unfluted 9/32 pilot to center it. I know I know… good luck with that. Ideas? How have you guys solved this?
    Here I thought a 7/16 forstner was hard to find...

    If you have a drill press the easy way is something that was in the instructions with my Ron Bontz saw plate, use the smaller bit to set up the piece clamped or in a vise on a drill press, then remove the bit without moving the work. Insert the larger bit and it should be on the hole's center. With this method, the small hole can be drilled from the bottom and then the tote flipped and lined up with the bit, power off of course, and then the bits changed.

    Without a drill press it will be a bit of a trick to get one hole centered on the other. In this case it is easier to drill with the forstner first and then center the smaller bit on the center mark left by the forstner bit.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  3. #3
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    Hi Jim, that sound like a pretty good solution. I have a drill press so I should be ok. Yea ...forstner first would have been better but the small hole will already be there.
    Thanks
    Mark

  4. #4
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    You are welcome Mark, it is something I learned because I read the instructions before making a saw handle this week.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  5. #5
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    Have been known to regrind an old spade bit to match the brass part's size. The tip would go into the shaft's hole nicely. I have had to tilt the table on the drill press to match the angle, as well. Had to mark on the spade bit a stop line, so I didn't go too deep.

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    Fortunate for me

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    Thought about that as a solution, but I was concerned about tear out. Thanks Steven.
    Mark

  8. #8
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    If you plan to do a lot of these you might want to invest in a piloted counterbore. The closest I found is 7/16" with either 9/32" or 1/4" pilot. I don't recall the price but Victor Machinery was the source. You might spring for a #12-20 tap from Victor as well to chase the threads in a Stanley base for the handles and frog screws.
    .

  9. #9
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    Hi Greg, I is the piloted counterbore the solid type or the counterbore interchangeable pilot?

  10. #10
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    I have dealt with Victor in the past. They had good phone support help when I bought from them. A quick look at their pages indicates they have many of the counter bores in steps of 1/64". They also have a $25 minimum last time I bought from them, so look through the site and see what else you need. I bought some extra 12-20 taps from them so one could be ground down for a bottoming tap. For plane taps you need to have that.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark R Webster View Post
    Hi Greg, I is the piloted counterbore the solid type or the counterbore interchangeable pilot?
    I have the interchangeable type.

  12. #12
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    Thanks Jim and Greg, after looking at the Victor site, as best I can tell I want a 7/16"High Speed Steel Interchangeable Pilot Straight Shank Counterbore and a 9/32" Pilot Diameter x5/32" Shank Pilot for Counterbore

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    Sorry we were posting at the same time.

  14. #14
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    I ordered a piloted counterbore today and in doing so discovered that you can in most cases get them in 1/64 increments up to an inch I think. So I was able to get a 29/64" Pretty cool.

  15. #15
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    Mark,

    I am fairly sure you already know this, but though to post it anyway, just in case of the slight chance that a quick reminder would be appreciated.

    When you repair the tote by glue up of an added piece to the top, drilling out, and then shaping, be sure to cut the added piece so that when you glue it on, that the flat surface of the added piece ends up facing up at a 90 degree angle to the long axis of the bit, that is at a 90 degree angle once you have it secured in the drill press.

    I know Forsners will cut at an angle, but life is easier if you don't have to. After you have the hole bored for the brass nut, then work the top down to the needed profile, and as you know, this approach will also reduce tear out.

    Like I say, not meaning to offend by mentioning the obvious, but thought to add it anyway just in case. Hope the repair turns out nicely for you.

    Regards,

    Stew
    Last edited by Stew Denton; 12-23-2016 at 11:13 AM.

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