Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 33

Thread: Repairing Hand Plane Tote Question

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    310
    Good reminder Stew, appreciate it, it is very hard to offend me

  2. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark R Webster View Post
    Hi guys looking for a little help. I am repairing a few totes for some old hand planes. The dilemma is this, I have a couple where the whole top end will have to be replaced. I will need to re-drill the hole for the rod through the new section of wood starting from the bottom existing hole. The problem comes when trying to center the counter sunk area for the brass nut. Any suggestions. The perfect solution would be a 29/64 forstner with an unfluted 9/32 pilot to center it. I know I know… good luck with that. Ideas? How have you guys solved this?

    Mark, Are you going to drill from the bottom of the tote up through the top of the totes?

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    310
    That was the plan.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dickinson, Texas
    Posts
    3,854

  5. #20
    Mark, There is a method that gunsmiths use to avoid runout of the exit hole and to place the top (or show) hole exactly where you want it. It's pretty simple and almost fool proof but any error would be hidden in the tote.

    Let me know If you're interested and I'll sketch up an explanation. I've used it but never taken any pictures.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    310
    Sounds interesting, if you have time. The first primary hole I tried to drill from the bottom (to my surprise) didn't come out in the center new top portion, even though the majority of the original hole was present to act as a guide. The bit diameter was as close as I could get it to the size of the existing hole.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    15,196
    +1 on interest in the method of getting more accurate hole drilling. I have tried drilling from both ends with varying success.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
    Posts
    4,148
    Somedays, the repair doesn't quite need drilled,
    rehab fulton.jpg
    On this one, the new Walnut just misses the old hole. Sometimes, I just get lucky....
    rehabbed.jpg
    Fulton #3 (Sargent 408)

    On the times where I have to drill a new hole, I use a smaller bit to chase the hole from below. then come back with the correct sized bit from the top. IF I need to, I can plane down a bit, and make the patch a bit thicker than needed. What I try to avoid is where a patch only covers a part of the top hole.....almost a guaranty to end ugly. The one in the pictures stopped right behind the top hole.
    Last edited by steven c newman; 12-25-2016 at 2:43 AM.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    310
    Sounds like an option

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dickinson, Texas
    Posts
    3,854
    I have ground spade bits to side with good results. It is a quick task to accomplish. Try drilling the hole on a waste block of wood.

    You could make the handle long, leaving a thick portion at the top of the handle. Then drill the expanded hoie to depth.
    After drilling the expanded hole, then shape the handle top.
    Last edited by lowell holmes; 12-25-2016 at 2:48 PM.

  11. #26
    Sorry I haven't posted that explanation yet. Family and friends are making Christmas and the time pass too quickly!

    I should be able to post by Tuesday. I think you will find it to be a helpful technique.


    EDIT:
    I found the source for the tool I use. I highly recommend it if you have the need to drill a hole that must precisely enter and exit from specific points. I've found it to be an extremely accurate method. It has to be perfect whenever you're drilling into wood and metal bits that you have thousands in.

    It will work equally well for a plane tote. If you understand how it works, you don't need the tool and knowing how to use it solves the problem. You do need a drill press.

    IMG_7748.jpg
    This is the bottom of the tool. Some all thread with a point on the end. Could be made with a drywall screw or a bolt. The tip could be sharpened or for repairing a tote, it can be a bolt that you find the center of the end on. The tool uses a concentric cone mounted in the drill chuck to align everything. Not essential, but very handy.

    For my last tote repair, I think I drilled a hole into a block of wood (clamped to the drill press table) with the size drill bit I was going to use. I then placed the bit upside down into the block of wood. I used a second (same size) bit to drill the hole in the tote.

    The key is that the lower bit (in the block of wood) and the chucked bit should now be in perfect alignment. Place the tote on the bottom bit. Check that your hole from the top of the tote is on center and drill. Don't drill so deep that you drill into your lower bit!


    Here is the info and directions for the guide I use and can highly recommend.

    "Center to Center Drilling Guide" item #0883
    R. E. Davis Company
    http://www.redaviscompany.com/0883.html

    Disclaimer: I have no connections to this company
    Last edited by Kevin Hampshire; 12-26-2016 at 7:54 AM. Reason: Added vendor information

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Asheville, NC
    Posts
    92
    I fixed a tote like yours. I found it was a lot easier to make the patch with the 7/16" hole already drilled. To get the surface of the tote level, I bolted it to a sled and ran it through the table saw first. Then all I had to do was align the patch with the tote and glue it in place.

    Attached is a picture that just needed a partial tip. For that, I left some material on the cocobolo patch for tearout. Then I chucked the biggest aircraft bit that would still slide in the channel and slipped the tote on upside-down. I clamped that in a screw-clamp, clamped the assembly to the table and turned on the drill press. To align the nut hole, I flipped it right-side up, chucked a shorter bit with the same diameter as the aircraft bit and realigned it the same as before. Then I replaced the bit with a 7/16" brad-point bit (with spur sides) and reamed the nut hole. You can still see the seam but Brazilian -- even scraps -- is too precious for totes.

    Good luck, sh

    No. 7 tote repair small.jpg
    Last edited by Skip Helms; 12-26-2016 at 12:14 PM.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    15,196
    Thanks Kevin for taking the time to share this method.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  14. #29
    Jim, You're too kind. I'm afraid my explanation was more rambling and less coherent than I intended it to be. I was rushing to get an explanation out before things got busy around the house.

    If Mark or anyone else would like further clarification, I'll try to clean up
    The explanation.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    310
    Very helpful thank you very much Kevin!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •