Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Moxon vise build with shopping list

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Cambridge, MA
    Posts
    16

    Moxon vise build with shopping list

    Hello all,

    Below I give a quick overview of a recent Moxon vise build. I thought I might be able to add to common knowledge by sharing the parts list, since that was a fair bit of annoying work to figure out, so I'll focus on that rather than the design and build. Coming up with cost-effective ways to get small amounts of hardware is tough! If you have better solutions to this specific problem (hardware for a Moxon vise) or to the general problem (cost-effective access to small amounts of hardware), please do share.

    Hardware list:
    2 x veneer press screws, ~$20 each w/ ship (e.g. here, here, here): $40
    3 x bronze shoulder bushings, ~$5 each w/ ship (e.g. here): $15
    2 x steel washer for the bronze bushing to bear on (e.g. here, but you end up with 50): $15
    2 x clamping collar to keep front chop moving outwards when unscrewing the vise (e.g. here): $15
    Approximately 12' of 5/4 hard maple: $varies, I can't recall
    Leather scraps to line jaws: $10

    Total: ~$85 in hardware plus the cost of wood, leather, glue

    The parts I used required some modification. You must remove the swivel pads at the end of the veneer press acme screws (easy on mine, which were Lee Valley), slightly enlarge the ID of the bronze bushings (dowel with sandpaper), and slightly enlarge the ID of the washers (dowel with sandpaper again). I'm sure it'd be helpful to future builders to have parts that just worked! Part of the problem was that the (discontinued?) veneer press screws I had from Lee Valley were an odd OD. Finding a bushing with a larger shoulder would also be helpful, and could even eliminate the need for the washers.

    The design could, I think, be improved with a thicker front chop but it works just fine as-is. I've planed a significant belly into the front side of the chop to account for bending. Aside from being stiffer, the thicker front chop would give more registration surface. Following the thoughts of Derek and likely others, I've refrained from putting a chamfer the length of the front chop (this also gave an opportunity to practice lambs' tongues!). Thanks again to Derek (if I recall correctly) for suggesting the little shelf on the back (it gives a place to clamp a pin board when marking out, among other things).

    The veneer screws also aren't a super close fit in their nuts, which leads to some slop in the vise. This, coupled with some slop in the fit of the bearings and screws in the front chop, allows for some racking as you open and close (which is a good thing). The front chop does droop as it's opened more and more, and this could be avoided with a design that fixes the threaded rods and uses nuts at the front chop (a la Benchcrafted?). However, this means rods sticking out the front of your vise. Looking back, it may have been smarter to just pay the $150 for the benchcrafted kit. This solution works just fine, so it's hard to tell.

    I believe there is 25" between the screws to accommodate a 24" panel with some room to spare. The jaws are roughly 6" high.



    A sketch of construction, without further ado:

    An in-progress trimming shot with ryoba







    Some jointing:





    A close-up of the hardware:






    Sketching out chamfers, etc.:






    Some shooting:






    A shot that gives you a good idea of the cross section of the rear of the vise:





    Chamfers / lambs' tongues all done:






    Here you can see the nuts for the veneer press screws mounted in the back of the vise:






    After some Tru-Oil:






    ....and finally, with some leather (applied with Weldwood contact cement):



    Hope you enjoyed,

    Matt

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    South West Ontario
    Posts
    285
    If you build an even bigger one you could share most of the hardware between the two and keep costs down, perhaps buy the hardware you can't share now just in case? If you do that they will both seem like a bargain

    As you use that with decent lighting is it better to stain it darker as a contrast to the workpeice and keep your pupils from contracting when working cherry or walnut?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Cambridge, MA
    Posts
    16
    I didn't think about contrast William, but it's a good point. I do probably work more light-colored woods on the balance, but there is some black walnut and pseudo-mahoganies in there too.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    4,210
    Nice project and thank you for identifying the parts needed!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    15,553
    Very nice indeed and another thanks for the parts list.

    My impression from looking at many of these was a chamfer across the front is to keep from sawing into the chop when cutting half blind dovetails. Like anything else, there are dozens of ways to accomplish the finished task.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    4,666
    Hi Matthew

    You've built a nice Moxon vise, and I wish you much pleasure in using it.

    The ledge at the rear is not my design. You would have got that from another. My vise does not have that part, since I prefer to raise the tail and pin boards above the chop so as to avoid scoring it when marking with a knife. That is why I do not recommend one going to the trouble of a rear mini bench. In your case you can still add my modification, if you so desire.



    The mods are here: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ShopMad...rtheMoxon.html

    The reason why Chris Schartz chamfers the top of his chop is because it is thick - much thicker than mine (since I use harder wood) - and the chop might obscure the board when sawing. Lifting the board also helps here in that regard. I like the flat section to use as a rest when paring baselines.



    The sides of the vise are well done and look like mine.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    15,553
    The reason why Chris Schartz chamfers the top of his chop is because it is thick - much thicker than mine (since I use harder wood) - and the chop might obscure the board when sawing. Lifting the board also helps here in that regard. I like the flat section to use as a rest when paring baselines.
    Good reasons for either style, lets make two!

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Cambridge, MA
    Posts
    16
    Thanks for the commentary all.

  9. #9
    Nice vise, Matt! I didn't bother with the chamfers on mine (lazy) but I did cut the chop slightly wider (taller) than the base and installed it with the tops flush. This small extension allows me to quickly register the vise to the front of my workbench before clamping it in place. No idea if it's traditional or commonly done, I just figured it would help after some of the issues I'd had working on a non-traditional workbench (i.e. no real workholding capability). I'll have to see if I can find and upload a photo of it, but I caution it's not nearly as good looking as yours!


    d
    Not all chemicals are bad. Without hydrogen or oxygen, for example, there would be no way to make water, a vital ingredient in beer.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Cambridge, MA
    Posts
    16
    Would love to see the photo Daniel, thanks very much!

  11. #11
    My Cost was $115 shipped.

    DSC02325.JPG DSC02326.JPG
    Tom

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Cambridge, MA
    Posts
    16
    Hmmm, interesting Tom. It looks like you bought vise hardware and some handwheels? Or is that the Benchcrafted kit, and you got it on sale or something?

  13. #13
    Finally got some pics. I built mine from the Benchcrafted hardware right around the time they came out with it. I used maple, because that's what I had lying around that was thick enough. Leather on the chop only.

    IMG_0598.JPG IMG_0600.JPG IMG_0597.JPG

    In the last, you can see how the chop is a bit 'deeper'. I tried to show how it registers on the front of the bench, but it's not on a bench (so I couldn't clamp it) and it would fall off. The routine is to close up the chop, set it on the workbench and slide it back until it stops, then clamp it in place. Then, when I open the chop, the back of the vise is plumb with the front of the workbench and I don't inadvertently dent something trying to clamp it up.

    Nothing pretty, but it works!
    Not all chemicals are bad. Without hydrogen or oxygen, for example, there would be no way to make water, a vital ingredient in beer.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Cambridge, MA
    Posts
    16
    Looks like an excellent vise Daniel, thanks for sharing.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •