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Thread: Wall-Mounted Media Console - Door Making

  1. #1
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    Wall-Mounted Media Console - Door Making

    Good morning, I've completed the sliding doors on the wall-mounted media console and have detailed parts of the process previously covered in brief. I hope that you enjoy reading the article and I look forward to your comments.

    https://brianholcombewoodworker.com/...onsole-hikido/
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  2. #2
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    Precise work indeed! The outside of the doors hides the extreme construction inside.

  3. #3
    Thinking of eventually building a sideboard of similar style, this is really making me think hard...lots of good ideas in the link!

  4. #4
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    Thank you both! I decided to show a hint of the construction with the through tenons, but even then they're difficult to see from the outside since the case is fairly dark.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Holcombe View Post
    Thank you both! I decided to show a hint of the construction with the through tenons, but even then they're difficult to see from the outside since the case is fairly dark.

    You just nailed the proportions on this thing. Keep the threads coming....

  6. #6
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    Precision work at its finest. I really think the attention to detail is superb. For example, the efforts you took to ensure the battens are bookmatched, also the grain matching / bookmatching of the panels, the allowances made for seasonal changes, the sliding dovetail batten fitting process, etc. I have no clue how you manage to create a tapered dovetail of only 1/64" over that span (I assume that both sides are tapered at 1/64", ie: not 1/64 total). Very well done.

  7. #7
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    very nice Brian. Excellent documentation and very inspiring. Loads of things I want to try out or tweak into some project.

  8. #8
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    Beautiful work Brian.

    regards Stewie;

  9. #9
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    Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious
    Jim

  10. #10
    Very, very nice!

  11. #11
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    Thanks gents! Much appreciated.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pat Barry View Post
    Precision work at its finest. I really think the attention to detail is superb. For example, the efforts you took to ensure the battens are bookmatched, also the grain matching / bookmatching of the panels, the allowances made for seasonal changes, the sliding dovetail batten fitting process, etc. I have no clue how you manage to create a tapered dovetail of only 1/64" over that span (I assume that both sides are tapered at 1/64", ie: not 1/64 total). Very well done.
    Thanks Pat! I had an ideal of zero taper, but a few of them were easier to work with just a very minor taper, I think the worst of them was 1/32 total but most were less.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  12. #12
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    Great work Brian. Always a pleasure to see the evolution of one of your processes for creating reality from your fevered brain. You are on fire boy.
    David

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    Thanks David!
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  14. #14
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    Nicely done, Brian. I appreciate your mention of the method to smooth out the "ear" after a near flush cut. On a piece like that with a cut out (or even without a cut out, for that matter) tear out is always a concern for me. It speaks to your confidence in the sharpness of your chisels and skillful paring. Dead flat with the rest of the piece and nice crisp corners is a detail many might not appreciate...but it goes without notice here, my friend

  15. #15
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    Thanks Phil! Glad you took a liking to that, I notice there are sometimes things like that, which are not entirely intuitive and can be a very helpful reminder.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

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