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Thread: Tea House Chair - Back and Arm Rests

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by James Pallas View Post
    Glad to here you are working on the arm. As soon as I saw the picture the lower side of the arm just jumped out and gave me a slap. The rest looks terrific. Nice to be able to follow the build on your blog.
    Jim
    Thanks Jim!

    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Chase View Post
    I measured with a scale the few times I worked with Urea-Formadehyde. It seemed to work fine, other than friends asking if the scale was for measuring drug deals.
    Much like broad axes, the scales are also multi-purpose. Honestly, I regret buying the glue every time I do. I've used similar stuff for veneer laminations and have been occasionally surprised in a bad way.

    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Chase View Post
    Surely you meant "Uwe Boll".
    Next level trolling
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  2. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Chase View Post
    I measured with a scale the few times I worked with Urea-Formadehyde. It seemed to work fine, other than friends asking if the scale was for measuring drug deals.
    For some jobs we used it even a little thinner than label info.

  3. #18
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    Well done, Brian. I find the arm quite appealing and fitting with the rest of the theme. Look forward to the final reveal!

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Mueller View Post
    Well done, Brian. I find the arm quite appealing and fitting with the rest of the theme. Look forward to the final reveal!
    Thank you!
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Holcombe View Post
    Much like broad axes, the scales are also multi-purpose.
    Indeed. Having either laying around is a sort of Rorshach test for acquaintances. Apparently the people I hang out with are drug fiends.

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Holcombe View Post
    Honestly, I regret buying the glue every time I do.
    Same here, but mostly because I don't use it often enough and it expires long before I consume it all. I've heard horror stories about plastic resin that's past its shelf life so I generally pitch it when it gets there.

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Holcombe View Post
    Next level trolling
    I'll take that as a compliment. You really can't blame the guy for finding a way to simultaneously provide a tax shelter and advance his... um... art.
    Last edited by Patrick Chase; 02-17-2017 at 11:15 AM.

  6. #21
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    That's happened to me with that sort of glue. The glue seemed to mix up fine after 1 year, but after "curing" in the press the panels peeled right off the substrate... they didn't peel off well enough to be saved, however.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  7. #22
    Brian, I doubt you mixed it too thin. The way we use it for that particular purpose is so thin that it will immediately drip ,not run off a stick. A thick coat on one surface won't work ,both surfaces need to be coated. The glue spreads and works better if you let it sit at least ten minutes after mixing. I'm pretty sure that used to be on the label ...but that was a long time ago. That makes a big difference on materials like Italian bending ply which are saturated with glue during manufacture; the rest makes the glue cover evenly. With out the rest the glue will kind of bead up ,resisting an even coat and requiring more spreading. Yes, the glue can go bad if not carefully stored. The container top needs to be replaced quickly, not after you have mixed what you need now! When buying 25 pound containers I have taken as long as two years to use it all. I put in some silica gel ,put container in thick plastic bag and store it in the office,not shop. I even put a piece of metal on for temp top while weighing it out. I asked a guy at the company if all that would keep it good. He said "yeah,if you're willing to do all that!" And I asured him I was. And I've bought and used a lot of it.
    Last edited by Mel Fulks; 02-17-2017 at 12:19 PM.

  8. #23
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    Thanks Mel, appreciate your insights. I did not know if thinner was better or worse than thicker, which was the majority of my concern.

    It should be a better glue for the application but I will likely do away with it unless I start doing enough bent laminations. To want to work out the kinks in my process. Titebond is something I've had much success with so it does offer some reassurance in that context which currently does not exist for me in plastic resin.

    I avoid epoxy for similar reasons and I used to use very high quality epoxies on knife handles....fast forward 15 years and I'm repairing that connection. I know it is a different context but I lack trust in certain glues.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  9. #24
    Brian, the thin mix I described has just a bit more water that what it has if mixed exactly like the mfg directions.

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