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Thread: Couple Weeks' Worth of Rust Hunting

  1. #1
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    Couple Weeks' Worth of Rust Hunting

    It's a risky business, what with the potential to contract tetanus and all, but someone's gotta do it. Anyway, since living in an area with good rust hunting prospects for the first time I've caught the bug and have been fortunate to add a few things to my tool collection that I've been looking for without luck for well over a year. And without further ado:

    Attachment 364038
    A nice old bowsaw frame. Wasn't looking for one, haven't ever needed one but this nice old fellow that I established a bit of a relationship with gave it to me for free on the condition that I make some use of it. Maker mark on it says "E.L. Donaldson" which I couldn't get any information on on the interwebnetz but it seems to be well-made except for that nasty twist in the cross-member piece or whatever you call it. Someday I'll try to gently bend it back with some steam. I have a friend who is experienced in bending/straightening wood with heat but he's out of town for a while.
    Attachment 364039
    Before cleaning up top, after cleaning below. I just used saddle soap (it's all I've got on hand right now) and a soft-bristled brush. It didn't get everything off but I don't have any 0000 steel wool or anything similar on hand right now. I just wanted to see what the grain would look like.

    IMG_4250.jpg IMG_4256.jpg
    Look at that sloppy saw work on the tenon shoulder! I've never done anything like that myself.

    Next up, this James Swan 1/8"....mortise chisel? Sure looks like one to me but all the other Swan mortise chisels I've seen have had different socket construction/ferrules. I figured it could be some sort of turning chisel but I know nothing about those. For me it'll probably be a mortise chisel, if I ever find the need to cut a 1/8" mortise.
    IMG_4233.jpgIMG_4235.jpg

    This saw vise is marked "No. 3" but nothing else so I'm not sure who made it. Looks similar to a Stearns. The jaws don't close up perfectly but they're tight enough to function, and better than my previous saw vise, which was nonexistent.
    IMG_4262.jpg


    This box of handles and other...things...was given to me for free. I honestly don't have much use for anything in here but I figured I'd post it up here. If anyone sees anything they might be able to use I'd be more than happy to send it your way if you pay shipping. Otherwise, these will likely become file handles or something similar. The dovetail saw handle looks like it could have belonged to a decent saw, it has split nuts that are beat to hell though. A couple chisel handles could be useful if anyone knows what brand of chisel they went to. The two T-shaped thingies...I have no idea what either is.
    IMG_4248.jpg

    And now the two big, exciting finds!

    IMG_4266.jpgIMG_4268.jpg
    An Edward Carter wedge-arm plow plane with no rust! I've been looking for a decent plow plane for well over a year but they were all either in dismal shape or out of my price range. It's also kind of cool that the maker was in Troy, NY and that's where I got it. This plane probably never left the city. This one just needs a little cleaning up, a repair to one arm that has been screwed back together, and it will then hopefully be a good user for me. I've never used a wooden plow plane so I'm looking forward to the learning experience.

  2. #2
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    More plow plane pics:
    IMG_4270.jpgIMG_4267.jpg

    Detour from the excitement: a Merit miter box. I don't need another miter box nor do I really have the space but it was $5 so hopefully I can find someone who wants it for more than that. It isn't particularly fancy and probably not as precise as the all-metal miter boxes but it has no rust and could make a decent user.
    IMG_4282.jpg

    And the other exciting find:

    A near-mint Stanley No. 7, another plane that's been evading me for well over a year. At $75 its the most I've ever spent on a plane but I couldn't say no given its condition.
    IMG_4283.jpgIMG_4284.jpg

    It's a type 19, which I understand is not quite as sought-after as some of the earlier types like the type 11, so it probably won't get me my membership card for the cool kid neander club. But it seems to be about as well-made as the older planes I have which include a type 11. The casting seems about as good which is the main thing I'm concerned about. The lacquer finish on the handles is hideous if you ask me but that isn't a big issue. The mating surfaces between the body and frog, and frog and iron are kinda rough but that's nothing a little fettling can't fix. We'll see how good the steel is after I get it sharpened. I'm sure it'll make a fine user for a hack like me. On another note, there are 4 holes on the left side of the body, and they're all tapped. I imagine the original owner had some sort of fence for the plane but I can't find any pictures of plane fences that look like they'd fit that hole configuration. Maybe he did what I like to do and spend more time fixing up and playing with the tool than actually using it to make things out of wood.

  3. #3
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    On another note, there are 4 holes on the left side of the body, and they're all tapped. I imagine the original owner had some sort of fence for the plane but I can't find any pictures of plane fences that look like they'd fit that hole configuration.
    Most likely the holes were user installed.

    My #10-1/4 came with a few.

    Sometimes the best laid plans of mice and men end up not working.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  4. #4
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    Nice Haul, keep at it. If you look in old tackle boxes and buckets of rusty tools, you may start finding blades to use in the plow plane. I have about four that I've found here and there without their plane. People generally have no idea what they are so they cost about 25 cents. You just have to train your own eye to look for them and see them without having to dig through the tetanus pile too much.

    The saw handle in your box is for a keyhole or compass saw, not a dovetail saw. You can steal a replacement blade from a new one or, if you're really looking for a project, cut a piece out of an old handsaw blade, tooth and sharpen it, and there you go. That's not a recommendation, though, as the next one you see will have the blade intact and will cost about a buck. There are some odd things in that box - like the two trammel-looking things in the bottom right, that you should investigate further.

    The chisel is likely a sash mortise chisel, for lightly cutting 1/8" mortises in delicate window sash - so light taps, not pounding. it may just have been intended as a 1/8" bench chisel, but the use is the same. Lathe tools don't normally have sockets or bolstered tangs because you don't drive them from the end (so there doesn't need to be a way to keep the handle from splitting).

    Nice to see some good finds, thanks for the posting
    Karl

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karl Andersson View Post
    Nice Haul, keep at it. If you look in old tackle boxes and buckets of rusty tools, you may start finding blades to use in the plow plane. I have about four that I've found here and there without their plane. People generally have no idea what they are so they cost about 25 cents. You just have to train your own eye to look for them and see them without having to dig through the tetanus pile too much.

    The saw handle in your box is for a keyhole or compass saw, not a dovetail saw. You can steal a replacement blade from a new one or, if you're really looking for a project, cut a piece out of an old handsaw blade, tooth and sharpen it, and there you go. That's not a recommendation, though, as the next one you see will have the blade intact and will cost about a buck. There are some odd things in that box - like the two trammel-looking things in the bottom right, that you should investigate further.

    The chisel is likely a sash mortise chisel, for lightly cutting 1/8" mortises in delicate window sash - so light taps, not pounding. it may just have been intended as a 1/8" bench chisel, but the use is the same. Lathe tools don't normally have sockets or bolstered tangs because you don't drive them from the end (so there doesn't need to be a way to keep the handle from splitting).

    Nice to see some good finds, thanks for the posting
    Karl
    Compass saw! That makes sense--there isn't a slot for the spine of a backsaw so I was confused about that. One more tool I haven't needed yet but maybe someday I will.

    The two other things at the bottom that you mention are awls--the metal collet screws off and points are stored in the handle. It's the other T-shaped things I really have no idea about.

    I looked up a sash chisel as well and that's gotta be it. I haven't needed a 1/8" mortise chisel yet but maybe someday it'll come in handy.

  6. #6
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    Quick update: more tools! Figured I shouldn't make a new thread since that could get ridiculous. This old fellow had a nice collection of tools that belonged to his grandfather, who was born in the 1880's. He didn't really have much knowledge about tools so he just asked me what I thought fair prices were for it all. The businessman in me is yelling "you idiot!" right now for not making a lowball offer for the whole pile but this gentleman was very nice and I didn't wanna screw him over so I went through the whole pile and told him what he had, and what most of the items might be worth. He had a few things that are pretty nice like a nearly-mint condition 28" Simonds 5PPI rip saw, a few Bailey planes in great shape, etc. I still made out pretty good though, and he was generous since I helped him figure out what he had.

    Without further ado:

    A 12" Richardson backsaw. 12PPI crosscut. Pretty good shape overall, it's got an S-shaped bend in the plate but the spine looks straight and I'm hoping that a little retensioning will straight the plate back out. The handle isn't very finely-shaped in my opinion but the finish is in decent shape so I'm not gonna touch it. It's good enough for a hack like me.
    fullsizeoutput_62b.jpg

    A 10" Dunn dovetail saw. As it is now the teeth are about 12PPI which is too coarse in my mind so I'll probably reshape it to 16PPI or so. It has split nuts (missing one unfortunately) so it might be pretty old. Looks pretty straight but the spine is tapped down too far. Shouldn't be a problem to fix.
    fullsizeoutput_62c.jpgfullsizeoutput_62a.jpg

    A Stanley No. 18 block plane with the newer, better-designed knuckle cap. I have a really old No. 18 with the older-style knuckle cap, and this is the first time I've gotten my hands on one with the newer-style knuckle cap design. The latter is a pretty cool little mechanism, and definitely more secure than the old style. It does put quite a bit of pressure on the iron so I'll have to be careful lest I bend an iron or even apply enough pressure to crack the casting maybe.
    IMG_0407.jpg

    A 6" rosewood try square in pretty good shape. Now I'll finally be able to come to some conclusions on the whole try square vs combo square fiasco I started earlier.
    fullsizeoutput_62f.jpg

    And perhaps the most unique tool for this particular forum: a no-name but very well-made broad axe. I'm no expert but I've read a decent amount about how to hew beams with a broad axe and dabbled in it myself. Hewing axes, or broad axes, are meant to be nearly dead flat on one side and only beveled on one side. I'd explain but it's probably easier to just look up a video of hewing on youtube. One thing I've learned though, is that the "flat" side should not be dead flat ideally. As you can see in this axe, there's a slight and consistent curve on the flat side--this makes it a lot easier to keep the axe close to the face you're hewing and the cutting motion closer to parallel with the face so that you can take nice, shallow bites without "barking your knuckles" as they say.
    In other words, this axe was probably made by a skilled craftsman who really knew well what a broad axe should look like. Most of the broad axes I've come across are dead flat on the flat side, and a good portion of them have been ground on both sides of the bit like a normal axe--not good!
    fullsizeoutput_62e.jpgfullsizeoutput_62d.jpg

  7. #7
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    Your hewing hatchet's general shape looks a lot like one I found:

    http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthre...tate-Sale-Find

    There may be a mark under the patina.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    Your hewing hatchet's general shape looks a lot like one I found:

    http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthre...tate-Sale-Find

    There may be a mark under the patina.

    jtk
    IMG_4318.jpg
    Quick rubbing with some penetrating oil and steel wool--doesn't look like a maker's mark is gonna pop up anywhere but there is a number "3" in the middle of the axe head. I know some axes were sold with a sticker or paper label on them rather than a stamped maker's mark so that could be the case here.

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