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Thread: My first (and probably last) drink from the green well

  1. #61
    A couple of points not mentioned already:

    the service tech didn't tell you not to use an extension cord - only that if you want "full power" a direct connection is preferred. You can read all about voltage drop here on the creek.

    "you should never have this plugged into and extension cord if you want full power. It must be plugged directly into the wall outlet".
    - 100 yr old poplar is going to be much harder than new birch.

    - The hitachi saw you mention has 600 more watts of power than the festool. That ain't hay. Coupled with the fact that the standard blade for it is a 24t , and it's easy to see why that cut better than the festool. It was better suited to the job.

    - re: a lemon. It's possible. You burnt up the motor, period. Using it incorrectly certainly contributed to that. I'd be more concerned that the electronics didn't work as advertised.

    Burnt motor = new armature. New armature gets new bearings from anyone seasoned in their replacement. The alignment was worrisome, could have been from the factory that way which isn't good.

    I would say that it is "nice" to have different blades for different jobs, but with high end equipment, that shouldn't be necessary.
    With more experience you'll learn this is often not the case. Big ol Italian bandsaws are popular around here, especially for cutting veneers. They are high end and expensive. But if you put a 6-10 tpi blade on one and try to slice veneer you'll have problems and won't like the results. And. it'll have nothing to do with the saw. Try crosscutting or cutting a curve with a blade suited for veneers and you'll also have a disaster. Not the saw's fault.

  2. #62
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    Read most of this whole thread and didnít see a post from the OP as to the result of sending it to Festool. As long as there was no apparent abuse I canít imagine Festool doing anything but repairing it. Did I miss the result? Usually tools are back in 2 weeks.

  3. #63
    Quote Originally Posted by Randy Heinemann View Post
    Read most of this whole thread and didnít see a post from the OP as to the result of sending it to Festool. As long as there was no apparent abuse I canít imagine Festool doing anything but repairing it. Did I miss the result? Usually tools are back in 2 weeks.

    see post # 40

  4. #64
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    Sep 2013
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    While I love my TS55 for its accuracy, precision, dust collection, and use it a lot, I too was (and still am) severely disappointed at its lack of power. It seems one shouldn't have to baby the saw through cuts in 3/4" plywood, which is what I find I have to do. My ancient PC saw, which sold new for about $129 will go through plywood just as fast as I can push it with a plywood blade mounted. I don't think it's too much to ask that a $650 saw be equipped with a big enough motor to do the same, even if it is a snazzy green. I'm pretty sure that cutting sheet goods with the stock blade must be something it should have been engineered for. I'd be happier if it cost $700 and I didn't have to wait for it to catch it's breath all the time-- I'm the old guy, after all!

  5. #65
    Quote Originally Posted by roger wiegand View Post
    While I love my TS55 for its accuracy, precision, dust collection, and use it a lot, I too was (and still am) severely disappointed at its lack of power. It seems one shouldn't have to baby the saw through cuts in 3/4" plywood, which is what I find I have to do. My ancient PC saw, which sold new for about $129 will go through plywood just as fast as I can push it with a plywood blade mounted. I don't think it's too much to ask that a $650 saw be equipped with a big enough motor to do the same, even if it is a snazzy green. I'm pretty sure that cutting sheet goods with the stock blade must be something it should have been engineered for. I'd be happier if it cost $700 and I didn't have to wait for it to catch it's breath all the time-- I'm the old guy, after all!
    I'll probably get ripped for posting this, but I've made cabinets on site with an 8 foot straight piece of phenolic material and my DeWalt circular saw. Zero issues, ever. Clamps and you're good to go. That's one tool where I'd put my money elsewhere. Just one guys opinion

    David
    Life is a gift, not a guarantee.

  6. #66
    Quote Originally Posted by David Cramer View Post
    I'll probably get ripped for posting this, but I've made cabinets on site with an 8 foot straight piece of phenolic material and my DeWalt circular saw. Zero issues, ever. Clamps and you're good to go. That's one tool where I'd put my money elsewhere. Just one guys opinion

    David
    My opinion exactly, but that's just for me. I read about how some people love them so much & start to think I need one. But then the next time I use my cordless Milwaukee saw & shop made straight edge I realize that it works just fine. For the cost of a TS55 & all the tracks, clamps, etc, I could be well on my way to upgrading to an 8" jointer, a Domino, or some other more essential tool.

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Sabo View Post
    see post # 40
    Don't see the result anywhere and I've counted all the posts. Doesn't seem to be at 40. No matter anyway. Everyone is entitled to their opinions. I've never had a single problem with Festool or their service department.

  8. #68
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    Apr 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Dowell View Post
    **update** - The saw has returned to me.

    Well, I can't be sure what makes one of these a "lemon". But, unless it is the armature and bearings, pretty sure it's more of the same.
    Attachment 368740
    This was post #40. Attachment shows what Festool did to resolve the problem. No need to count them, just look for the post # in the upper right corner of each post.

    FWIW, I doubt any TS55 owners, such as myself, wouldn't like a little more power in the saw.
    Mark McFarlane

  9. #69
    sounds like a $39.00 Skill saw from HD would out-perform the Festool you have. I don't drink from the Festool fountain either...

  10. #70
    I remember the time I replaced my $25,000 all-wheel-drive Jeep Grand Cherokee with a $120,000 rear-wheel-drive 560HP BMW M5 with high performance tires. And when I wrecked it, all I could think was, that when I spend that much on something, I shouldn't have to put new tires on it to make it drive well on ice and 2 feet of snow....

  11. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Kievit View Post
    I remember the time I replaced my $25,000 all-wheel-drive Jeep Grand Cherokee with a $120,000 rear-wheel-drive 560HP BMW M5 with high performance tires. And when I wrecked it, all I could think was, that when I spend that much on something, I shouldn't have to put new tires on it to make it drive well on ice and 2 feet of snow....
    probably should have hired someone to drive it. dave
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 10-19-2017 at 1:56 PM. Reason: fixed quote tagging

  12. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Kievit View Post
    I remember the time I replaced my $25,000 all-wheel-drive Jeep Grand Cherokee with a $120,000 rear-wheel-drive 560HP BMW M5 with high performance tires. And when I wrecked it, all I could think was, that when I spend that much on something, I shouldn't have to put new tires on it to make it drive well on ice and 2 feet of snow....
    You bought a Jeep Grand Cherokee for $25K?! Not brand new right?
    If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

  13. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Rivel View Post
    You bought a Jeep Grand Cherokee for $25K?! Not brand new right?
    Not in recent years, at least. My original one back in the 1990s was probably in that range...my current one, well...and it's a 2012...stickered for $53K. Same thing for MY18 would sticker for close to $60K. But we digress...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #74
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    Dec 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Cramer View Post
    I'll probably get ripped for posting this, but I've made cabinets on site with an 8 foot straight piece of phenolic material and my DeWalt circular saw. Zero issues, ever. Clamps and you're good to go. That's one tool where I'd put my money elsewhere. Just one guys opinion

    David
    I used to feel the same way but decided to try a TS75. I did a lot of work the way you described but I have to say that the track saw is handy. Actually it is mostly the track. I would make a phenolic base for an old 8 1/4" Speedmatic I have and just buy the track if I had to do it over again. The cut of the Festool is good, but not any better than the Speedmatic.

  15. #75
    Quote Originally Posted by David Cramer View Post
    I'll probably get ripped for posting this, but I've made cabinets on site with an 8 foot straight piece of phenolic material and my DeWalt circular saw. Zero issues, ever. Clamps and you're good to go. That's one tool where I'd put my money elsewhere. Just one guys opinion

    David
    How's the dust situation with that set up? Seriously, I did the same as you for years, and you're quite right, no issues with quality of cut or performance. I upgraded to a track saw mainly because the dust collection is so good and if you're working in the field (or even in the shop) in enclosed conditions, keeping dust down can be an important factor.

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