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Thread: Starting line up

  1. #1

    Starting line up

    Well a few weeks and $80 and I have a little pile of tools. The chisel are pexco Buck Bros Ohio tool and a 720. They look like they need some work. I don't know how to sharpen them and I don't really know how to use them correctly.
    The planes are a type 9 Bailey #5 a Sargeant made Craftsman and a newer block plane. I have a WTB in the classifieds for some better block planes but no takers. Oh well I don't really know how to use the planes either.
    I'm here to learn. I'm not a Neanderthal and I have no desire to hand plane 200bdft of walnut, I have a machine for that. But knowing how to use hand tools will make me a better wood worker

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Libertyville, IL (Chicago - North)
    Posts
    252
    Hey Kent. Welcome.
    Keep your eye open for hand tool woodworking events near you. Taking expertly tuned tools for a test drive is a great way to understand what they can and should do.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    16,093
    Howdy Kent,

    There is some useful information in the archive:

    http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthre...al-wisdom-FAQs

    There is a post of mine there, Getting Started With Hand Planes you may find helpful:

    http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthre...th-Hand-Planes

    As to sharpening, where to start?

    Maybe knowing what equipment you have to work with would be the best place to start.

    Do you have a grinder or any sharpening stones?

    If you are in the Pacific Northwest send me a note if you would like to get together and test drive a few different sharpening options. Otherwise you may live near others who are just as willing to help someone get started on their journey to sharpness.

    The chisels you mentioned are likely all high carbon steel. This has advantages and disadvantages depending on whose opinion one listens to. One advantage is they can take a lower sharpening angle which is great for paring. One disadvantage is the edge doesn't hold up for as long as some of the modern steels.

    My bevel angle preference for paring is about 20-25 and 30 or a little more for chopping.

    Lie-Nielsen has tool events regularly, here is where to check to see if there will be one near you:

    https://www.lie-nielsen.com/hand-tool-events

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Goleta / Santa Barbara
    Posts
    564
    Where you located? There are many here who might be willing to have you visit their shop and give you a few pointers. You won't find a nicer group of people willing to share.
    Welcome, Patrick

  5. #5
    rsz_1planes.jpgrsz_chisels.jpg
    I'm in Dayton OH
    I couldn't get the pictures to load from my phone.
    That poor Stanley 720 (second from bottom) it's a paring chisel and someone pounded it into a mushroom shape >:-( I need to take care of that rust right away. $20 total on the chisels.
    I bought The Stanley #5 on EBay ($35+$15) it had received the paint can treatment. It had so much paint loaded on you couldn't see the patent numbers. I soaked it in lacquer thinner and cleaned it with a toothbrush. some of the parts are rough but there's no pitting on the bed. The Craftsman is a Sargent 409 I think, $10 at the flea market

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Stone Mountain, GA
    Posts
    193
    Those look like pretty nice tools. Nice job cleaning up the #5. That block plane is similar to one I have...it's not so bad, you can get work done with it.

    I would look at getting something flat that you can stick some 80 or 100 grit sandpaper to to get blade backs flat and clean and free of pitting. It's the best way to go, in my opinion, for old tools. I like the granite surface plates, they are pretty inexpensive nowadays.

    Some decent sharpening stones, a little practice, and you'll be on your way.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
    Posts
    5,141
    About an hours drive from my house? I am up north in Bellefontaine, OH. You are welcome to come up this weekend and try a few planes out in the Dungeon Shop..even bring along your planes, and we'll get them working.

  8. Hey Kent, I could have written your post. Thank you for it. I am a first time poster and a power tool wood worker also, but have now been taken up with hand tools and the fascinating world of hand planes in particular, actually addicted to the genealogy of the planes and now wanting to learn to use one. It all started with a small, no-name plane my late father gave to me when he was living. I had it on a shelf in my shop for about ten years but decided to clean it up and research its origins this past summer. I now have about 10 planes to work on for this winter, no laughing, as I know a lot for a beginner but I also just retired so will have plenty of time for it. In any case most of my internet time of late has been learning about planes and plane restoration...the forums have been most enjoyable to me!
    BTW I never pinpointed the make of my fathers plane, I am thinking it was a Sears catalogue product from the 50's or 60's

  9. And oh yes, forgot to add my thank you to Jim K. for posting the information links

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    16,093
    Quote Originally Posted by angus macdonald View Post
    And oh yes, forgot to add my thank you to Jim K. for posting the information links
    Howdy Angus you are welcome and welcome to the Creek.

    Kent,

    Here is a post of mine on restoring a mushroomed socket:

    http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthre...-an-Old-Chisel

    If the mushrooming doesn't affect too much of the socket it might be just as good to file it off.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    2,230
    Kent, take Steven up on his offer, he is very good at what he does. I have brought tools hand planes there as well. Of course, if you want to wander out to Columbus, I can throw those things onto my Tormek making it easy to free hand sharpen them for a bit. No comment on flattening the backs since that can take some time. Steven is probably more efficient at that than I, but I am happy to help you there as well as needed; but it is a long drive for you.

    Same goes for you Angus, but I have no idea where you live.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    1,395
    The best thing you can do as a neophyte Neanderthal, is to visit with someone who has well tuned planes. Using them will really open your eyes to the possibilities, and let you know what to strive for. Second best is one of the LN or other hand tool shows that are around. Usually LV is at the Woodworking Shows, though I haven't seen LN there recently.

  13. Thanks Kent, I am in Nova Scotia, so a bit of a distance, haha But I like the idea of connecting with someone who has an experienced hand at .working with these tools and hand planes. I don't know what the appetite is in my area.

  14. Should of said thank you Andrew, sorry there

  15. #15
    I'll have to take you up on that offer this fall

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