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Thread: Good excuse to buy a Domino?????

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Colorado
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    365
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Friedrichs View Post
    One last hint: if you buy the systainer full of dominos (and the cutters), buy it from amazon.de. The price is ~half the US price, and you can still get 2-day shipping.
    Dan, thanks for the tip about buying the dominos and cutter from Amazon.de. I ordered the 8mm/10mm kit for my XL. It seemed that the credit card needed to be a business (commercial) credit card and I was not able to get 2-day shipping. Shipping is about 4 weeks and there was an additional charge. However, even with the shipping charge and VAT it was just a little over half the cost of buying from my regular sources.

  2. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Sean Nagle View Post
    Dan, thanks for the tip about buying the dominos and cutter from Amazon.de. I ordered the 8mm/10mm kit for my XL. It seemed that the credit card needed to be a business (commercial) credit card and I was not able to get 2-day shipping. Shipping is about 4 weeks and there was an additional charge. However, even with the shipping charge and VAT it was just a little over half the cost of buying from my regular sources.
    Nice - I originally heard the tip from Van Huskey (on this forum), so can't take credit for the "discovery".

    Odd that your regular credit card wouldn't work.

    I think if you filter by items that are "Prime", you can get the 2-day shipping. When I bought a kit, it said it was going to take weeks to arrive, but then they DHL overnight'ed it, and it came before the Domino (which was shipped 2-day from Ohio...).

    I also found that while Amazon offers currency conversion (EUR to USD), their rates weren't as good as those I get through my no-foreign-transaction-fees credit card. So I bought it in EUR.

    Also, you shouldn't have to pay VAT - it should automatically remove it once it sees a US shipping address? If you bought from a 3rd party seller, maybe they didn't know (or have that automated).

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    365
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Friedrichs View Post
    Odd that your regular credit card wouldn't work.

    I think if you filter by items that are "Prime", you can get the 2-day shipping. When I bought a kit, it said it was going to take weeks to arrive, but then they DHL overnight'ed it, and it came before the Domino (which was shipped 2-day from Ohio...).

    I also found that while Amazon offers currency conversion (EUR to USD), their rates weren't as good as those I get through my no-foreign-transaction-fees credit card. So I bought it in EUR.

    Also, you shouldn't have to pay VAT - it should automatically remove it once it sees a US shipping address? If you bought from a 3rd party seller, maybe they didn't know (or have that automated).
    I did purchase it from Amazon.

    My personal credit cards didn't appear, but my two business credit cards did. I tried adding a personal card, but it didn't add it.

    I didn't see a Prime option on shipping.

    There was no VAT called out, it just had a comment that it was included.

  4. #19
    Personally, I think that you could *easily* justify a domino.
    Also, I think that the Domino would be perfect for most Midcentry danish style furniture...since most of those are veneered slabs stuck together with dowels/pocket screws.

    There are many other designs that you may want to consider though.
    It'd be interesting to see what your daughter likes!

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Colorado
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    To follow up, I already received my 8mm/10mm Domino kit for my XL from Amazon.de. It was shipped via DHL as Dan mentioned, though not overnight.

    Great tip! However, now I get Amazon.de email flyers... in Deutsch of course ;-)

  6. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Cary Falk View Post
    I'm not seeing how a Domino would make the legs any easier. There is no way with the Domino to get at some of the angles unless you make some kind of jig. It would be easier for me on a table saw with the blade tilted. Pocket screws would be pretty easy also. But to answer your real question, Yes you should get a Domino if you want one.
    Not meaning or trying to call you out, but which angles the domino with its angle fence cant handle with regard to the table the OP plans to build? The domino joiner is designed to handle those angles well which are not complex angles at all.

    Depending on the stock thickness, such joints can be cut perpendicularly or at an angle without using any jig. The domino joiner doesnt work like a plunge router, a misconception I have heard from many of my pals.

    Simon
    Last edited by Simon MacGowen; 11-21-2017 at 12:30 PM.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Camas, Wa
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    3,214
    Quote Originally Posted by Simon MacGowen View Post
    Not meaning or trying to call you out, but which angles the domino with its angle fence cant handle with regard to the table the OP plans to build? The domino joiner is designed to handle those angles well which are not complex angles at all.

    Depending on the stock thickness, such joints can be cut perpendicularly or at an angle without using any jig. The domino joiner doesnt work like a plunge router, a misconception I have heard from many of my pals.

    Simon
    I am just having a hard time picturing ho to do the angled joints were the chair sits. So lets put that board flat on the bench. The board that is below the drawer sticks up at an angle of say 60 degrees to the right and then 120 degrees from the other side. You can't attack it from the right because the fence can't go above 90 degrees. If you attack it from the left with the fence set at 30 then only the fence(not the base part that normally contacts the wood would move once the bit made contact. If you made a 90 degree entry on each face I would be difficult to clamp. The fence also doesn't do more than 90 degrees like a PC biscuit joiner so you would need some kind of jig. I sold my Domino so what do I know.

  8. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Cary Falk View Post
    I am just having a hard time picturing ho to do the angled joints were the chair sits. So lets put that board flat on the bench. The board that is below the drawer sticks up at an angle of say 60 degrees to the right and then 120 degrees from the other side. You can't attack it from the right because the fence can't go above 90 degrees. If you attack it from the left with the fence set at 30 then only the fence(not the base part that normally contacts the wood would move once the bit made contact. If you made a 90 degree entry on each face I would be difficult to clamp. The fence also doesn't do more than 90 degrees like a PC biscuit joiner so you would need some kind of jig. I sold my Domino so what do I know.
    There are basically three angled joints in that table (excluding the right angle ones), please see the picture. The mortises can be cut as shown depending on how a user is familiar with the tool. The angled ones are harder because of the clamping needs you pointed out, but doable if you hold down the tool firmly or against a batten clamped on the surface. Sometimes, you need to add the registration surface with a block if the mortises are close the edge. Experimenting and experience will make a difference there.

    I have done more demanding angled joints than those shown in the picture (two sharp angled joints for instance) and no jigs were needed. One reminder: the exact angle of entry is not critical as long as the mortises are cut the same angle. I know someone on another forum who is really good at using the domino for his furniture business; he previously used the plunge router and lots of loose tenon jigs, none now.

    Simon
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Simon MacGowen; 11-21-2017 at 1:39 PM.

  9. #24
    Hi,
    I wonder if a good strategy might be to bolt the Domino machine to a table and bring the angled workpieces to it on a ramp cut to the appropriate angle?
    Alternatively, could you hot glue wedges to the face of the machine and plunge vertically (at an angle) into the flat surface, braced against a temporary batten? Or hot glue wedges to the fence allowing it to do what your PC biscuit joiner does in registering to the end of an angled workpiece past 90 degrees?

    I'd say the Domino can easily be used for this project, and it would be fun, and maybe not that difficult to figure out the jigs and solutions to make it happen. A teacher of a class I once took really opened our eyes to what many tools can do when the possibilities expanded by using jigs and aids.

  10. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Edwin Santos View Post
    Hi,
    I wonder if a good strategy might be to bolt the Domino machine to a table and bring the angled workpieces to it on a ramp cut to the appropriate angle?
    Someone has done that too. His machine set-up used with the compressor for workholding is pretty neat.

    Simon

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Providence, RI
    Posts
    142
    Quote Originally Posted by Simon MacGowen View Post
    Someone has done that too. His machine set-up used with the compressor for workholding is pretty neat.

    Simon
    Someone? Link?
    -- Jim

    Mr. Natural sez, "Use the right tool for the job."

  12. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by James Morgan View Post
    Someone? Link?
    Try the search or post your inquiry in the Festool Forum. The guy posted pictures and videos of his set-up there.

    Simon

  13. #28
    John, NO brainer. Buy the large Domino. I have a small and a large. I also have a stationary mortiser at work and at home. The Domino is a game changer and you will NEVER regret it, only that you waited. Life is short, live wood large, Mike, Klawock, Alaska

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    266
    Just ordered the 500 with the tenon assortment systainer. Visited Highland Hardware in Atlanta when visiting a couple of years ago and met Chris Bagby, the owner, and his daughter Molly at the Lie Nielsen festival in Maine last July. Nice folks and had a nice visit with them. Pricing is universal so I thought it would be nice to support an independent retailer, even if all the way across the country. A wedge of pecan and pumpkin pie tomorrow will help with my buyers remorse.

  15. #30
    How do deal with wood movement? Or is this a plywood design?

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