Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 17

Thread: Selecting a Surgeon

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Northern Oregon
    Posts
    1,396

    Selecting a Surgeon

    I'm trying to find a cataract surgeon. Here's what I'm learning.
    First I talked to a trusted friend who sells eyeglasses. She says don't use DR XYZ. She told me she refers to a clinic a Dr in her office uses. It's called a laser eye surgery center. However for cataracts they don't use a laser but do the far more common traditional cataract surgery. I'm confused, so more research later I find out laser cataract surgery is new, may not be better or covered by insurance. So still looking at that.
    Another trusted friend who works for many surgeons says don't use DR XYZ as well. She tells me some details and will get back to me with a recommendation.

    I call a Dr who did a laser retina repair for me. He doesn't do cataracts but his office recommends DR XYZ! I Google Cataracts "choosing a surgeon" and find what seems to be an eye research website not selling anything. They say pick a "board certified Dr" and up comes DR XYZ!! Reviews at DR XYZ's website are near perfect. The other Dr's my friends have been happy with have no reviews.

    I'm puzzled, but not really that much cause it's a business. What get's me is the places that sell eyewear seem to be locked into a system that keeps you coming to them. I have a whole other story that shows why online glasses are not only less costly but can get you better vision.

    Just venting but I welcome feedback as well.
    "Whether you think you can, or you think you canít - youíre right."
    - Henry Ford

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
    Posts
    133
    Look on RateMDs or equivalent to see what is said about Dr. XYZ. You'll need to put in your city, I just used Portland for a link. They have a section for Optometrists. Here you would go through your family doctor or Optometrist and not from a lens/frame store.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    672
    Just about all medical service providers appear to have business arrangements that link them to other providers for referrals, so that you almost never get a referral that is outside their network or mutual agreements. Most of the independent medical practices around here have been bought out by the major for-profit health companies so you have to recognize that recommendations are not always based on any real knowledge or experience. Just my opinion, no data to support this.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Highland MI
    Posts
    3,048
    Blog Entries
    11
    And some non-recommendations can be for personal, not professional reasons. Do you want someone with good bedside manner or top notch skills as an eye surgeon? Give me someone who has been doing a dozen a week for ten years (I did). He also has good manners.
    NOW you tell me...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    2,876
    Why do they say to avoid XYZ? Unless they had a darned good reason, I would go with your surgeon's recommendation.

    There is one local practice and when I moved here I picked one doctor at random, figuring they were all probably competent. I am happy with my choice.

    I don't know much about cataracts (except that mine will be ready in about 5 years) but people I talk to on the ski lift (I wear prescription goggles and people ask about them) tell me they can see as well at they did 50 years ago.

  6. #6
    Just as important as the selection of your surgeon is the selection of the lens. Don't know what your situation is down there but eight years ago in BC Canada, insurance only covered hard single focus lens. I did my research and decided to go for a flexible multi focus lens. The surgeon I was dealing with who had done some previous surgery on me, and would have done the cataract surgery if I had selected the hard single focus lens referred me to another surgeon who had developed the procedure for the multi focus lens. It wasn't covered by insurance so I had to pay out of pocket but I have no regrets, I have near perfect vision both reading and distance without glasses for the first time since I was 12 years old (68 now). My prescription was at the extreme range of what was available in the lens I chose, I was very shortsighted. So do some research on the lens and ensure the surgeon you select has experience with that lens.

  7. #7
    Some are better than others. I know of a rotator cuff shoulder operation that patched up the patient like brand new. Surgeon is known as "the best". When same person needed the other one done insurance company would not pay that fee and patient had to use another one. That operation improved the problem. Doc said in recovery room he ran into a problem,but thought he fixed it. But it is not as good as the other side. But it was cheaper! I see no problem choosing a surgeon based on reports,Doctors do their own rankings ,if it's OK for them it's OK for you.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    42,323
    In addition to other things, if your area has a hospital that has an eye specialty, they may also be a good referral source. When I had my LASIK back in 2003, I used a surgeon and suburban facility associated with Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #9
    Recently, during a hospital stay (11 days) for pneumonia, I had to have fluid drained from lung cavity, lung deflated, and scraped. Surgeon removed almost a liter of fluid from right lung cavity. Absolutely NO PAIN. He came from another hospital to perform operation, because hospital said he was the best, and I TOTALLY AGREE! Didn't get to choose, as hospital did it for me.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Northern Oregon
    Posts
    1,396
    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Garson View Post
    Just as important as the selection of your surgeon is the selection of the lens. Don't know what your situation is down there but eight years ago in BC Canada, insurance only covered hard single focus lens. I did my research and decided to go for a flexible multi focus lens. The surgeon I was dealing with who had done some previous surgery on me, and would have done the cataract surgery if I had selected the hard single focus lens referred me to another surgeon who had developed the procedure for the multi focus lens. It wasn't covered by insurance so I had to pay out of pocket but I have no regrets, I have near perfect vision both reading and distance without glasses for the first time since I was 12 years old (68 now). My prescription was at the extreme range of what was available in the lens I chose, I was very shortsighted. So do some research on the lens and ensure the surgeon you select has experience with that lens.
    Thanks Doug. I'll check the lenses out.
    "Whether you think you can, or you think you canít - youíre right."
    - Henry Ford

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Helensburgh, Australia
    Posts
    1,676
    I have both eyes done about 10 years ago and I don't think the new multi focus lenses were available so I experimented with mono vision using contact lenses and it is fantastic but not everyone can tolerate it. I was extremely short sighted to the point of being handicapped without contact lenses or glasses and had been since I was a child so to wear no glasses or contacts for anything including reading is fantastic.
    Chris

    Everything I like is either illegal, immoral or fattening

  12. #12

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    598
    For some professions the free rating services can be gamed, whether intentionally or not I do not know.

    Referrals from other doctors are good. Referrals from other people you trust are good as well. A cheap and easy thing to do is look up the person you are considering with your state’s medical licensing board. They will have a record of serious misconduct or professional discipline.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Bedford, NH
    Posts
    785
    As others have said above research objectively. I would much rather have an opthalmologist that graduated from the ivy league colleges than from a relatively unknown college or university. They should also be certified members of the American Academy of Opthalmology, perhaps even other additional certifications, but very importantly, they should have significant experience with an excellent record. Of course you may be limited as to how far away this surgeon is located from you as the surgery will require periodic follow-up visits to check on the healing progress.
    To often those that are involved with selling glasses/lenses have an ulterior motive. Also, those opthalmologists that belong to too many boards may spend more time administratively than operationally.
    Thoughts entering one's mind need not exit one's mouth!
    As I age my memory fades .... and that's a load off my mind!

    "We Live In The Land Of The Free, Only Because Of The Brave"
    ďThe problems we face today are there because the people who work for a living are outnumbered by those who vote for a living."
    "
    Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery." Winston Churchill

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Wayland, MA
    Posts
    989
    Unfortunately anecdotal evidence, beyond "she has a nice smile", "he patiently listened to me complain for 20 minutes", or "they called me back after three days to see how I was doing", tells you nothing about the quality or competence of medical providers. I'd personally rather have a competent curmudgeon than a less competent doc that ticks all the boxes for great bedside manner.

    Two things that you can ask that my medical friends tell me are useful are 1) How many cases like mine do you treat a week/month/year? and 2) What is your infection rate? For something like cataract surgery you want someone who is doing many cases a week. These are the guys who are in the best practice, have well-trained staff and processes, and can afford the best equipment. Surgery is a physical skill, and practice makes perfect. The second question helps you figure out whether, overall, they are careful and attentive about what they do. Infection rates are the product of many small things that have to be done correctly and a low one doesn't happen by accident.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •