Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 44

Thread: woodpeckers ultra-shear chisels

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    sykesville, maryland
    Posts
    35

    woodpeckers ultra-shear chisels

    Anyone try? I'd like to hear about them.

  2. #2
    Donít know anything about them except that they are not cheap!

    Left click my name for homepage link.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    sykesville, maryland
    Posts
    35
    I haven't found a "cheap" quality turning knife yet. I'm new to turning. I don't want to spend too much time sharpening (and learning how to do that too) and all the costs that go with that. At this point, I want to spend my time turning. I've turned a few things with a cheap set of HSS tools that I have. But, of course, they don't hold an edge long. I'm a pretty quick learner and was "successful" enough turning a few things with them. But, I hate sharpening. I'm more about making turned wood things first. As I get more comfortable, perhaps come back around to HSS tools. Woodpeckers has always had good quality things. I like the 45 degree flats and beefiness of these tools. And they claim the sharpest carbide available (of course they do). I can't find any user reviews of these though. Maybe they are too new? Or is that no one wants to buy them?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Shenandoah Valley, Va.
    Posts
    8,794
    Having to replace carbide cutters [they do get dull!] is high dollar outlay on top of high dollar tools initial cost, and in my considered opinion will not give one as good results over all, as traditional tools. To me, sharpening is an intregal part of turning, and one short changes themselves by not learning to sharpen, and quality gouges will outlast any carbide tool, save money by a wide margin in the long run, and adds skill sets about how to achieve fine cuts and less sanding on projects. Carbide tools are basically scrapers , and do have their place in the turning arsenal, and for those who just dabble in the turning craft are an option.....far from the best way to go in my opinion, but I’m a guy who enjoys how to learn all the cuts, and to sharpen all the tools.
    Remember, in a moments time, everything can change!

    Vision - not just seeing what is, but seeing what can be!

    For information on my website, click on my profile or avatar


  5. #5
    Thomas, turning is close kin to woodworking with hand tools - planes, chisels, etc. Unfortunately, sharpening is the very first activity necessary for quality work. There is nothing wrong with the carbide tools, but sooner than you think you will want to expand your skills with some quality gouges. The money you spent on the carbides would go a long way toward those. Just a thought.

    Left click my name for homepage link.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Colorado Springs, Co.
    Posts
    80
    Thomas,
    You may have chosen the wrong pursuit if you don't to sharpen. It is an integral part of woodturning. You may want to find a club near you.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    sykesville, maryland
    Posts
    35
    With much respect to you all, I've read and read about the pros and cons of carbide vs HSS, and all the stuff about learning to sharpen and how to make various cuts, etc. etc. I get it. A "real" turner knows how to sharpen and use every tool. I have far more energy and inclination that I do time. Eventually I'll have more time. I'll will get there.

    I didn't post to debate this or my dispassion for sharpening (sorry I mentioned it). I'm looking for feedback on these carbide chisels wrt to other carbide cutters, handles, blade holders, etc. Woodpeckers holder is different that any other I've seen. And they claim the micro grain carbide cutters are new technology that produce good shear cuts when used on a 45 degree angle. Looking for someone that has actually used these and has enough experience with both types of cutters to assess what they do/don't do well.

    I'll continue to practice with the cheap chisels I have while at the same time learning to appreciate what carbide might bring (if I buy a set). Everyone takes a different path to reach the same end.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    TX, NM or on the road
    Posts
    706
    If you want to try the carbide, I would recommend checking Capt Eddie's YouTube site. He sells carbide "kits" that consist of the cutter and the shaft, and you turn a handle. They are the least expensive ones on the market, and there are thousands of satisfied customers. But I am not one of them, I have tried several brands, and have donated all of them to people that are kess fortunate than I am.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    sykesville, maryland
    Posts
    35
    Quote Originally Posted by Marvin Hasenak View Post
    If you want to try the carbide, I would recommend checking Capt Eddie's YouTube site. He sells carbide "kits" that consist of the cutter and the shaft, and you turn a handle. They are the least expensive ones on the market, and there are thousands of satisfied customers. But I am not one of them, I have tried several brands, and have donated all of them to people that are kess fortunate than I am.
    thanks for the tip. I'll check that out.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Central MN
    Posts
    15
    Aren't carbide cutters all pretty similar?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    sykesville, maryland
    Posts
    35
    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Ost View Post
    Aren't carbide cutters all pretty similar?
    not according to woodpeckers. That is what I'm trying to assess, their micro grain cutters. And the question is also about the blade holder, in combination with their cutters. Is a Sorby gouge the same as a cheap Chinese gouge? I suspect not all carbides are equal either. Like Gillette razor blades compared to walmart's brand. The are both razor blades, but not the same.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    4,764
    Quote Originally Posted by thomas lucas View Post
    not according to woodpeckers. That is what I'm trying to assess, their micro grain cutters. And the question is also about the blade holder, in combination with their cutters. Is a Sorby gouge the same as a cheap Chinese gouge? I suspect not all carbides are equal either. Like Gillette razor blades compared to walmart's brand. The are both razor blades, but not the same.
    It would be easy to buy their inserts and make your own tools. Then you can try them yourself and decide.

  13. #13
    Thomas,

    I am looking at the Woodpecker chisels as well. I like the angled flat side that should make it easier to do a shear cut. Like you I have too little time to spend it sharpening lathe chisels (yes I and pretty fair at sharpening all manner of tools) but I am not fond of it and if I can short circuit that part of it it would be easier to work in some turning. Please keep me posted on your findings if you don't mind

    Jack Lemley

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Lummi Island, WA
    Posts
    441
    Iím sorry but I just donít get the aversion to sharpening. I, like many others use a wolverine jig for gouges - it takes all of 30 seconds to sharpen a gouge. Literally. The initial learning curve, if youíve got an average attention span is about an hour. Iíll only sharpen once or twice while roughing for an entire day. finish turning means sharpening more often, but come on, is the project youíre working on important enough to spend less than a total of maybe 5 minutes refreshing an edge? Sometimes stepping away allows you to see what youíre actually doing from a new perspective.

    So, just whatís the big hurry?

  15. #15
    My experience with carbide is that the profile of the carbide edge is critical to the cut you get. If you want to try out carbide insert tooling - then go ahead and do it. Lots of people use it. I would recommend getting 1 holder and then a at least one of every single insert out there on the market. Try them out. See which ones you like the best for which wood and and for which task.

    Conventional steel cutting inserts used in machine shops with basically a 90 degree face last about forever - but they tend to cut pretty rough and require a lot of pressure... It's like using a dull tool... But it stays at that level of semi-sharp dullness forever.... These would probably do Ok for stock bulk removal tasks on hard non-fiberous woods and interrupted stock removal cuts. I doubt you will be happy with them for finish work. And they are a train wreck on stringy, spongey fiberous wood like Spruce.

    The cupped cutting tip inserts do a lot better on wood - but they are very fragile... The more heavily cupped - the better they cut wood.. And the more fragile they are.. And once they lose that super sharp edge on the cupped tip - you are back to cutting forever with a semi-dull tool that cuts a bit better than the run of the mill square or diamond inserts... These are not good for interrupted cuts. And you have to watch them for stock removal... Chip the edge or crack it and that's that. The other danger is that because of the cupped cutting edge - they can pull chips if you aren't careful.

    What you will probably find is that you like some specific inserts for stock removal and then others for closing in on the final shape before sanding...

    Unfortunately - for smooth finishes - you will find yourself honing your carbide inserts on a diamond stone to polish up the edges to get decent finish cuts. Even then - they still chip...

    I feel your pain on sharpening. I sharpen my chisels a whole lot more now that I have a Worksharp....

    With the prices of tool inserts - I think I would price out a high quality electric sharpener with jigs and stops set up to handle HSS tools... I hear the Sorby unit and Tormek are both good. Once set up - you could resharpen in 30 seconds and be back on the lathe in no time..

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •