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Thread: DP735 Planer End Effects

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    DP735 Planer End Effects

    I was lucky to run across one of these for sale. $300! In perfect shape, light use. I saw it when I bought it, there are some end effects on both ends. A visible line across board and a slight apparent depth change. Is this normal? Is it technique related? I do want to eventually install a spiral head. I have a picture, but its hard to see.

    Edit: Sorry, DW735
    Last edited by Mike OMelia; 01-07-2018 at 5:42 PM. Reason: titel misspell

  2. #2
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    I saw on Amazon, infeed, outfeed tables for $46. Is that a good price?

  3. #3
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    It is called snipe. It happens when the weight of the board overcomes the pressure of the outfeed roller and the end of the board raises up into the knives. Infeed and outfeed tables will help as well as raising the board on the outfeed table with your hand a little as it comes out. If you get the tables set them so that the outer most ends are about the thickness of a dime above the table. Easiest way to do this is to get a level or straight edge and set it on 2 dimes at each end of the table. Raise the ends of the tables to touch.

  4. You're getting snipe. It's what happens when the board is no longer supported by both the infeed and outfeed rollers. You might notice that, at the end, the board slaps down on the planer outfeed. That's snipe. It's not that hard to fix, you can just run another sacrificial board through before and after, those boards will get the snipe and your workpiece will not, you can support the piece feeding in and out, which will minimize snipe, you can adjust the infeed and outfeed tables up slightly which will also minimize it. It's just inherent with the design of most lunchbox planers.

    Good job on the purchase, that's a great price.

  5. #5
    Sounds like you are describing "snipe. I have the DW735 with the Byrd head on it and the extension tables. I had a problem with snipe until I adjusted my tables and my technique of feeding stock through the planer. I still get a small amount of snipe but can easily be sanded out. $46 sounds like a good price for the tables to me but I haven't done a search on them so there may be a lower price out there somewhere.

    Jack

  6. #6
    As others have said what you are seeing is snipe and it can be cured. I have a Delta 12-/12" lunch box style planer and I eliminated snipe by mount the planer in a table with longer solid in feed and out feed tables that are exactly even with the plane bed. You can see the table in the photo below.
    lsfence1.jpg
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  7. #7
    A new word for your vocabulary ;-) Snipe is a feed path control issue. In the example below the stock is feeding left to right. As it leaves the control of the infeed roller (the roller on the left) the improperly supported stock weight causes the feed path to foul. This can also be caused by the absence of a carriage lock (allowing the cutterhead assembly to shift under stress) although the DW735's design does not require one. Therefor I would look to your stock support on the infeed and outfeed as a solution. Unsupported infeed path can leave you with snipe on the leading edge as well.

    Planer Snipe.jpg

    I have adjusted snipe out on dad's DW735 by raising the outer ends of the tables about 1/16" This fix only works if the stock being cut is long enough to engage the tables and be exposed to the effects of the adjustment. That is, it will work for a 30" long board but, not a 13" long board for example.

    Some folks deal with snipe by hot-gluing sacrificial boards to the ends of more precious stock when additional spoil cannot be tolerated.

    Snipe cure long stock.JPG

    This same method allows "too short" pieces to be thickness planed as well.

    plane small stock.JPG

    HTH
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 01-07-2018 at 8:26 PM.

  8. #8
    "Tweaking" the height of the (optional) outfeed tables might help. Really, some degree of snipe will occur, no matter what, unless you do what Glenn suggested re: sacrificial strips. Unless the amount is excessive, you can also just ignore it (and sand it out).

  9. Quote Originally Posted by Dan Friedrichs View Post
    "Tweaking" the height of the (optional) outfeed tables might help. Really, some degree of snipe will occur, no matter what, unless you do what Glenn suggested re: sacrificial strips. Unless the amount is excessive, you can also just ignore it (and sand it out).
    Or you can just calculate the waste into your parts list and cut it off at the end.

  10. #10
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    Thank you. I do not have much experience with planers. Heard about snipe. and its not bad, easily sanded out. Just wanted to be sure I understood what was going on. I mostly build guitars, and this was an almost unneeded addition to the shop. But at $300... oh well, it has a new home and a new job to do (brace work thicknessing and shaping). I will order those infeed outfeed tables and adjust as suggested. I normally did this work on my Jet 22-44 drum sander. But its slow going that way.

  11. #11
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    I am not going to dive in with the spiral head just yet. But I wouldn't mind learning some. I've heard about the diameter install issue, etc. OEM diameter, or smaller, less complicated install diameter? Crap, from what I can see, Id have more in the head than I do in the machine!
    Attached Images Attached Images

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Henderson View Post
    Or you can just calculate the waste into your parts list and cut it off at the end.
    This is what I do also.

  13. #13
    Mike, try it with a fresh set of HSS knives before you decide you need spiral.

  14. #14
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    Sep 2016
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    Modesto, CA, USA
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    Sounds like you are new to running a planer and snipe. Just one safety tip make sure no board is shorter then the center to center horizontal distance of the infeed and outfeed rollers. This is probably around 6-12 inches longe ron bigger machines.. If you ignore this rule the board can float up into the cutterhead and break/jam/throw expensive stuff right at your face and torso.
    Bill

  15. #15
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    Sep 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike OMelia View Post
    ... I normally did this work on my Jet 22-44 drum sander. But its slow going that way.
    In that case, you'll soon appreciate your drum sander even more, as it deals with snipe removal very quickly. The snipe on my planer is rarely more than a few thousandths. Couple of passes through the sander, snipe be gone.

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