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Thread: Article #2: Cutting Board Tutorial by Mike Schwing

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Modesto CA
    Posts
    105

    Great Help

    I just ran across your article and it was what the doctor ordered. I was looking for cutting board ideas for Christmas presents. Very helpful and well written.

    Thanks

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Denver, CO U.S.A.
    Posts
    35

    Thumbs up

    Thanks for the tutorial! I've made 6 now for gifts & I need many more to supply demand. (maybe free is too cheap?)

    I am able to make them with just a Bies fence. I use shop made set up blocks so I can move the fence accurately.

  3. #18
    Mike I really liked your turorial. I am a beginner at woodwork and I made several cutting boards out of red oak for my family for Christmas. I didn't think they turned out to bad. I am attaching a picture of them. This is the first time so I have lots of room for improvement. I started woodworking in Jan. '04 after a near fatal 4-wheeler wreck. I asked my husband while I still laid up hooked to an epideral to go and find me the tools I needed to start a wood shop. I love it. Thanks so much for the info. I shall try.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by peggy gaddis
    Mike I really liked your turorial. I am a beginner at woodwork and I made several cutting boards out of red oak for my family for Christmas. I didn't think they turned out to bad. I am attaching a picture of them. This is the first time so I have lots of room for improvement. I started woodworking in Jan. '04 after a near fatal 4-wheeler wreck. I asked my husband while I still laid up hooked to an epideral to go and find me the tools I needed to start a wood shop. I love it. Thanks so much for the info. I shall try.
    I like what I can see of them! But the picture looks very small?
    Can you upsize a little so we can see better?
    Chris
    "I have worked myself up from nothing to extreme poverty." Groucho Marx
    http://www.youtube.com/user/TheChrisPineWorkshop

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Kokomo, Indiana
    Posts
    12
    Mike,
    Thank-you for a superb tutorial, very well put together. The Incra jig is nice piece of precision equipment. What a work of ART.
    Even an old blind sow gets an acorn once in a while!

  6. #21

    How have these boards held up?

    These boards are gluing endgrain to endgrain with no reinforcement at cool stripe detail. How have they held up in use? I'm a full time box and board maker for whom these questions are of profound importance, and the chance of gaining a little knowledge at someone's else expense (for a change...) is too hard to resist. see my work at www.alladd.com. Thanks!

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairview Heights, Il
    Posts
    3

    Cutting board End Grain

    Mike

    I have always understood that end grain will not glue up very well. How did you get the the 3 sections to stay together. Did you use dowels or biscuits? Just glued them up without anything?

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Sharon, CT but planning to move to Woodbine, Georgia when this house sells.
    Posts
    1
    It looks like it might be a better structural option to glue an inlay in, rather than try to glue end grain. Maybe that's what was done??

  9. #24

    Sealer for Walnut

    Quote Originally Posted by Rajiv Dighe
    Ok, Be prepared for stupid question...

    I have always heard of walnut being toxic wood. Given that is it safe to use it in an application where it will be in contact with food? Or is the toxicity of walnut referes to something else?

    --Rajiv
    Hi Rajiv :
    You can get a Specil sealer for wood if they are to get in contac with food check your wood magazine's in the sealer section

    Edward Vasek Where are you from we are in SE South Dakota

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Harrison Arkansas USA
    Posts
    201
    If I decide to make one of these, you won't see it with a knife on it but hanging on a wall. That is some beautiful work, Mike

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Mills River NC
    Posts
    124

    Great Gift Idea!

    Mike, It'll be interesting to see how many years the compliments continue to come. I've made a few cutting boards that I was pleased with, but nothing like you have created. I have a big slab of cherry that I bought years ago sitting in the shop and I know that piece of wood is ready to sacrifice itself for something beautiful. Now, I just have to find a piece of maple or something light in color and that will complete the question of what to make for this Christmas! Thanks for the inspiration!

    Roy

  12. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Wayne Stoops View Post
    It looks like it might be a better structural option to glue an inlay in, rather than try to glue end grain. Maybe that's what was done??
    It would be possible to rip that strip down for an inlay of about a quarter inch thick. A couple extra steps and some precision cutting required.

    I wondered about the end grain glue up too.

    However, there are methods for getting a good end grain glue line without resorting to epoxies.
    Here is an end grain strength test I found somewhere on the web
    http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthre...32076#poststop

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Canada, eh
    Posts
    103
    Quote Originally Posted by Cliff Rohrabacher View Post
    It would be possible to rip that strip down for an inlay of about a quarter inch thick. A couple extra steps and some precision cutting required.

    I wondered about the end grain glue up too.

    However, there are methods for getting a good end grain glue line without resorting to epoxies.
    Here is an end grain strength test I found somewhere on the web
    http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthre...32076#poststop
    Just hope he's still reading this thread 3 years later...

  14. #29
    Mike,

    Thanks for the great how-to article on making your cutting board. I created two this weekend with only a minor design change. I placed the thin 1/32 strip inboard with the thickest piece on the outside. The wood combo is Hard Maple and Jatoba (Brizillian Cherry)

    Michael
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    Last edited by Michael Sapper; 11-28-2009 at 11:27 PM.

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    High Point, NC
    Posts
    12
    This has been a very interesting discussion. I was quite surprised to see how long it had been going on. May I add some things?

    Walnut is perfectly good for use in a cutting surface. It actually follows the general rule of thumb well; use wood from a tree with a running edible sap (hard maple) or edible nuts. The only exception to this rule is oak which is far to porous to keep sanitary, IMHO. What shouldn't be used are some of the exotic woods which have toxins and spalted wood. If the insects won't eat the wood, then it isn't safe to use. There are toxins in the wood which the insects have long ago learned to avoid. Spalted wood looks good but the bacteria that is creating the spalting is deadly to humans.

    Wood dust from any wood will make a person sneeze and this certainly isn't an indicator of an allergic reaction. Genuine mahogany at one time made my eyes water but I am not so sensitive now and it doesn't bother me.

    Finishes and glues are another question altogether. Polyurethane glues are messy and difficult to work with and aren't safe for direct or indirect contact with food. Because of its stiffness, good knife edges will suffer from the contact like trying to cut on glass. Type one wood glue isn't good enough because it will melt when in contact with water. Type two wood glue is better, will stand up to occasional contact with water but doesn't have the waterproof capacity type three has. Mineral oil is the standard finish used but there are some other polyurethane finishes available as well. Watco Butcher Block oil is one of the poly finishes. Sitting on or near the surface after application, it will finally chip away after a while. (I wonder where the chips went?)

    Gluing end grain? Only difficult if you are trying to glue an end to an end with a butt joint.
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