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Thread: Replace outside newel post

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    Carol Stream IL
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    106

    Replace outside newel post

    I need some advice. I installed 2 6x6 turned newel posts when I rebuilt my front porch in 2001. Thought I was smart in buying pre-primed pine. Well, the bottom 3-4" are starting to rot since the porch is only 3" above ground level and exposed. I was going to just splice on some green treated but hay, what's that humongus lathe for anyway. Anyone turned redwood or ceder for this type of situation. Thought about trying green treated after I let it dry a few months and use enormous amount of dust collection but then was jolted into reality. Or maybe just glue up some pine, turn and prime/seal up real good and try again.
    David Mueller

    Knowledge gained is directly proportional to the amount of equipment destroyed.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    Near Grand Rapids, MI
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    David,

    This may sound sacreligious but instead of turning the entire post, what if you spliced in a section of treated wood at the bottom of the post. I'm guessing the bottom part is square so you wouldn't have to try to turn the treated wood.

    Of course, we are in the turner's forum so get yourself a big cedar log and let the chips fly
    Jerry Vander Till
    Once I couldn't even spell injuneer, now I are one.

  3. #3

    hey

    Standard primed posts out of pine usually dont last long outside unless they are completly covered by a nice dry porch .They are treated but it doesnt work well. If I was to make my own post for exterior use I would use either southern yellow pine ,white oak,or hondurous mahogany.If you plan on glueing the post use a polyurethane glue and itll outlast your home.
    hope that helps.good luck
    I think I got saw dust in my drowers again......


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    Carol Stream IL
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    Jerry, I still have that as my backup but am going to try and turn new posts.

    Robert, since they're painted, don't need expensive or grained wood, just something to get er done. I did paint the bottom of the posts before I installed them but I think water was getting into the trim I had around the botttom. Time to go wood shopping.
    David Mueller

    Knowledge gained is directly proportional to the amount of equipment destroyed.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Were I faced with this issue (and I may someday since I have six 100 year old turned pine posts on my porch), I might be inclined to glue up some cypress. And leave the bottom 12" or so square and wrap that with a PT skirt. Paint and caulk the bejeebers out of it. But the key element would be to sit the post atop something an inch or so thick that will last forever. The skirt would hide it, but when the paint and caulk fail, the water will never make it way to the cypress.

    This makes sense in my head, but not sure if I've explained it properly.
    Only the Blue Roads

  6. #6
    andys got it......02 tod

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Oak Ridge, NC
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    The replacement of the bottom part works quite well. No matter what you do, restore or replace, you need to protect the bottom from resting directly on any masonary work. Bricks, concrete, cement blocks or what ever, they hold moisuture right against the wood. Paint the bottom surface. Get some zinc or lead flashing and cover the bottom, worse case a piece of roofing felt or a shingle tab. Anything to keep the wood from being in direct contact with the masonary. If it rests on wood it wouldn't hurt to do the same.

    Before you cover the end surface also cut a few grooves both directions on that surface. Say 1 1/2 to 2" apart like this "#". Only need to be about 1/8" or so deep. This gives you a little air circulation.

    Moisture is held against the end grain of the wood and you need to remove that chance and then give a way for moisture that does get trapped under there a way out. The post will out last you if you do that.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Carol Stream IL
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    Andy and Mac, you both nailed it. I have a concrete porch and the post sits right on top. Now the rot is mainly on the side from water damage under the trim but I did set the post right onto the concrete and there are 4 angle brackets to tie down. The porch roof posts I have on 1/2" alum. feet but I didn't have enough height on the brackets to do that on the newels.

    I like the idea of some alum. flashing or other underneith. someone else suggested some system three rot fix to coat then paint over that. I got a lot of great ideas so far. I think it would be a great project to turn replacements, just need to decide on what wood and design. I'll turn them now and finish when it warms up. Thanks to everyone.
    David Mueller

    Knowledge gained is directly proportional to the amount of equipment destroyed.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Andy Hoyt
    Were I faced with this issue (and I may someday since I have six 100 year old turned pine posts on my porch), I might be inclined to glue up some cypress. And leave the bottom 12" or so square and wrap that with a PT skirt. Paint and caulk the bejeebers out of it. But the key element would be to sit the post atop something an inch or so thick that will last forever. The skirt would hide it, but when the paint and caulk fail, the water will never make it way to the cypress.

    This makes sense in my head, but not sure if I've explained it properly.
    Ditto on the cypress. I have 4 cypress adirondack type patio chairs that are pushing 20 years old now with nothing but BLO finish every 4 or 5 years. Wind, hail, rain, snow, they've outlasted several mailmen.

    Redwood and cedar are durable woods but will show everytime you bump them.

  10. #10
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    Carol Stream IL
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Fuller
    Ditto on the cypress. I have 4 cypress adirondack type patio chairs that are pushing 20 years old now with nothing but BLO finish every 4 or 5 years. Wind, hail, rain, snow, they've outlasted several mailmen.

    Redwood and cedar are durable woods but will show everytime you bump them.
    Seems good but since they are to be painted white to match the trim, is cypress more expensive over others? I'll check it out.
    David Mueller

    Knowledge gained is directly proportional to the amount of equipment destroyed.

  11. #11
    Join Date
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    Location
    Carol Stream IL
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    Finally got an image if it's worth anything.

    Attachment 30402
    Last edited by David Mueller; 02-23-2006 at 1:33 AM.
    David Mueller

    Knowledge gained is directly proportional to the amount of equipment destroyed.

  12. #12
    Cypress is very inexpensive wood. It is also very soft and very light in weight.

    White oak is a good outdoor wood as is honey locust and Osage Orange.

    If you soak the endgrain in epoxy, two or three coats, it will eliminate the transfer of moisture up the posts.
    The Large print givith
    and the fine print takith away

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