Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Woodwright Catalyzed Finish

  1. #1

    Woodwright Catalyzed Finish

    Hi all,
    The other day, I was in an Amish woodshop...soon to be my woodshop

    And he was using a finish called WoodWright Catalyzed Wood Finish. It is a two part system 50/50 that smells like lacquer. Anyway, he was finishing some dressers and the surface was just awesome....so I asked about it. He told me that he had spent a lot of time with lots of different finishes and this stuff is the best he's used and it is hard hard hard. He also said that he makes Hot Pot Holders with this finish and you can put pans on it from the stove without hurting the finish. (with a little wink disclaimer that the pans shouldn't be "too hot") I saw pieces that he had done with 1, 2, and 3 coats on Ash. 1 coat looked rustic, 2 coats was glassy with some ingrain, and 3 coats was like glass.

    I want to get some of this stuff, but thought I'd ask the Forum if you'd had any experience with it. I did a search but didnt find any threads. This just might be a great Finish.

    Thanks!
    ~john
    "There's nothing wrong with Quiet" ` Jeremiah Johnson

    I live in Steve Schlumpf's basement...under the stairs

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    1,578
    Sounds like a great finish. Was it a spray on?
    Good, Fast, Cheap--Pick two.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Southport, NC
    Posts
    2,957
    Yes, it's a lacquer. Catalyzed lacquer is a two part finish used by many professional and commerial finishers. Until recently, it was the preferred finish for high end kitchen cabinetry. As far as I know, it must be sprayed. In addition, you should be sure to follow the recommendations contained in the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). It's available from a number of sources that cater to the professional finisher. It's being replaced by two part polyester finishes for kitchen cabinets and some high end panel surfaces.

    I would not consider it a finish to be used by an amatuer.
    Howie.........

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Cecil Arnold
    Sounds like a great finish. Was it a spray on?
    Cecil, he told me that he sprayed it when he wanted multiple thin coats and brushed when he wanted thick coats. He did note that with round things, it behaved extremely well, without sagging, if sprayed on thin. That would be my objective if I go ahead and get some....Which I probably will. Some things just gotta be tried at least once!
    ~john
    "There's nothing wrong with Quiet" ` Jeremiah Johnson

    I live in Steve Schlumpf's basement...under the stairs

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    1,578
    John, from what Howie said it sounds like it could be tricky, but I don't think I would let that stop me. Let us know how it works once you get around to trying it.
    Good, Fast, Cheap--Pick two.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    37,801
    Let me distill what Howie was driving at...catalyzed lacquers can be very, very DANGEROUS to work with. If you don't have the right kind of facility and equipment, it's best to avoid them. There are so many other choices that work oh, so very well.
    “Never raise your hands to your children, it leaves your groin unprotected.” - Red Buttons

    If you want your spouse to listen and pay strict attention to every word you say -- talk in your sleep...

    Be safety conscious. 80% of people are caused by accidents.

    Equestrian Sports. The most fun you can have with your boots still on...


  7. #7
    Ok Jim...now that's a consideration that I've not entertained. When you say "dangerous" are you taking about explosive qualities? I did notice that the shop was very fumey...more so than regular lacquer. I would rather not blow up the shop if I can avoid it.
    ~john
    "There's nothing wrong with Quiet" ` Jeremiah Johnson

    I live in Steve Schlumpf's basement...under the stairs

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    37,801
    Dangerious in the sense of personal health as well as shop environmentals. One really has to wear propert atire and respiration when using these materials, above and beyond anything you need for NC lacquer. Per Howie's sage recommendation, please read the MSDS for any product you plan on using as a finish. Most hobbiests don't have anything close to the right environment or personal protection to handle certain finishes.
    “Never raise your hands to your children, it leaves your groin unprotected.” - Red Buttons

    If you want your spouse to listen and pay strict attention to every word you say -- talk in your sleep...

    Be safety conscious. 80% of people are caused by accidents.

    Equestrian Sports. The most fun you can have with your boots still on...


  9. #9
    Ok Thanks. I understand. I have a nice advantage of being employed by a chemical company and I get nice top-of-the-line chemical and hazmat handling equipment. My respirator is fitted with Organic Vapor and Acid Gas filters and does a wonderful job. Nevertheless, I'll study the MSDS and ensure proper handling and equipment. Thanks!
    ~john
    "There's nothing wrong with Quiet" ` Jeremiah Johnson

    I live in Steve Schlumpf's basement...under the stairs

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Southport, NC
    Posts
    2,957
    >> My respirator is fitted with Organic Vapor and Acid Gas filters and does a wonderful job

    Some of the newer professional finishes require forced fresh air respirators. Filters are not sufficient.

    On another point, most of these catalyzed finishes require a special sealer. And, most have specific requirements as the maximum film thickness. Too thick and the finish can crack and craze.
    Howie.........

  11. #11
    Thanks again Howie. sounds like this idea becomes less and less viable. I'll probably have to stick to the conventional stuff.
    ~john
    "There's nothing wrong with Quiet" ` Jeremiah Johnson

    I live in Steve Schlumpf's basement...under the stairs

  12. Woodwright Catalyzed Finish

    John,
    Woodwright Catalyzed Finish is not a lacquer, it is a post-catalyzed conversion varnish. And is available locally in Middlefield, Oh. if you are still interested please contact me. Thanks, Scot

Similar Threads

  1. tung oil question
    By Ted Daigle in forum Project Finishing
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 10-18-2013, 1:27 PM
  2. Tung Oil, BLO, Danish Oil - is there a difference
    By Roger Barga in forum Project Finishing
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 11-12-2012, 2:15 PM
  3. Poly? Urethane? Polyurethane?
    By Vaughn McMillan in forum Project Finishing
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 11-15-2005, 7:01 PM
  4. Gloss black chest
    By Steve Jenkins in forum General Woodworking and Power Tools
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 09-05-2004, 1:38 PM
  5. Tung Oil Finish Practicality
    By Jim Young in forum General Woodworking and Power Tools
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 08-07-2003, 1:54 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •