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Thread: Cross grain inlay (or veneer)...

  1. #1

    Question Cross grain inlay (or veneer)...

    Are there any problems associated with an inlay running across the grain of a 32" table top ? The inlay would be running across the grain of a solid wood plank built table top.

    I would like the inlay to be as thick as possible without having problems related to expansion and contration across the grain.

    . Is this even wise to try ?
    . Any thoughts on how thick the inlay can be ?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    N E Arkansas
    Posts
    386

    Cross grain inlay

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Apple - Central IN
    Are there any problems associated with an inlay running across the grain of a 32" table top ? The inlay would be running across the grain of a solid wood plank built table top.

    I would like the inlay to be as thick as possible without having problems related to expansion and contration across the grain.

    . Is this even wise to try ?
    . Any thoughts on how thick the inlay can be ?
    Eric what about cross grain inlay, that should expand and contract almost the same.
    Espansion and contraction will happen, if the table will be in a house with central heat and air, it will contract across the grain and move very little after contracting if the heat and air is maintained.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Redwood City, CA
    Posts
    6,516
    Eric ---
    You already know the trouble you're headed for. The substrate lumber wants to expand and contract across the grain, but the cross-grain veneer doesn't want to do that. Here's a couple suggestions:
    1) Redesign your inlay so the veneer grain runs the same direction as the substrate veneer. Then you can make it as thick as you care; the whole thing breathes together.
    2) If you must make the veneer cross-grain, make the veneer as thin as possible. When it is very thin, the substrate actually stretchs it. Commercial veneer, at .025" thick, would be good.
    3) If you must make the veneer cross-grain, put a veneer of similar thickness and grain direction on the other side of the substrate. This makes a "balanced panel", which is much less likely to warp. The top veneer and the bottom veneer put similar stresses on the substrate.

  4. #4

    Thanks

    Thanks for the advice Bobby & Jamie. I managed to get agreement to change the inlay from QS lacewood. I will be going with a cross grain inlay in something else to match the grain direction of the planks.

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