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Thread: Mesquite dribble cup

  1. #1

    Mesquite dribble cup

    Here's a little mesquite goblet I made. 5" high, stem is 1/8" at its thinnest. Finish is spray shellac. The mesquite was very forgiving during sanding. Because of the void, I had to do a lot of hand sanding, and I was very thankful to the mesquite

    -Joe
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  2. #2
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    Looks like a good job Joe. Mesquite is pretty stable and I love working with it. Looks good.
    Bernie

    Never put off until tomorrow what you can do the day after tomorrow.

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.



  3. #3
    Way to go Joe! Nice one!

    Corey

  4. #4
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    Looks like it will hold just the right amount of wine. Nice job Joe.

    Ernie

  5. #5
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    Way neat, Joe! That's got wonderful form. I wondered from the title what you meant by "dribble"; Now I know! Great job.
    Cheers,
    John K. Miliunas

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  6. #6
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    When I read "dribble cup" the first thing that came to mind was the Saturday Night Live skit with Dan Akroyd.

    Interesting piece there, Joe. I particularly like the thin stem.
    George

  7. #7
    That's a lovely goblet, Joe.
    That's not a light at the end of the tunnel; It's a naked singularity.

    Henry C. Gernhardt, III

  8. #8
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    Sorry, I can't call it "nice". Looks like a failure to me. Is that what they call an example of turning the inside diameter larger than the outside?

  9. #9
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    Don't mind him. He obviously don't know nuttin about art. How did you get the stem so thin? Got a steady rest? NICE looking goblet.

  10. #10
    Art is subjective. Can't fault someone for their opinions.

    No, I didn't use a steady. I put some cloth in the bowl of the goblet, brought the tailstock up VERY LIGHTLY just to steady the bowl. I then took very light shearing cuts with a very sharp spindle gouge, thinning in steps from the bowl back to the foot. The idea is not to put pressure on the stem, but let the wood come to the edge to be cut.

    -Joe

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Stewart
    Don't mind him. He obviously don't know nuttin about art. How did you get the stem so thin? Got a steady rest? NICE looking goblet.
    Yes, I do know about art. A cup like that WITHOUT the big hole in the side would sell for $20.00. With a big, broken hole in it, we call it art and it sells for $1000.00.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Fusco
    Yes, I do know about art. A cup like that WITHOUT the big hole in the side would sell for $20.00. With a big, broken hole in it, we call it art and it sells for $1000.00.
    $1000 you say? Want to buy a goblet?

    -Joe

  13. #13
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    He DOES know about art. I stand corrected.

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