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Thread: Ungluing PVC pipe

  1. #1

    Ungluing PVC pipe

    Is there a good way, or not so good way, to unglue 1-1/2" pvc drain pipes? I need to make a change to some plumbing and don't have room to add a coupling.
    Lee Schierer - McKean, PA

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  2. #2
    Hi Lee, I worked in a PVC manufacturing plant back in the 70's and we used a lot of the stuff around the plant. I'm afraid once it is bonded that's it. Someone else may have an idea. Sorry.
    Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
    Don

  3. #3

    Here's what I do..

    Lee, I cut the pipe as close to the coupling as I can, then use a saw (broken hacksaw blade in a handle) to cut the pipe lengthwise inside the coupling (without cutting the fitting), doing this two or three places around the diameter of the pipe, then prying each of these sections out. Follow up by sanding/cleaning inside the coupling. It's slow, but works. I don't know of any solvent that would work.
    Roger

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    They are not "glued"...they are welded...by the solvents. Once they cure...it's permanent. The two pieces actually become "one" with each other. You'll need to get creative or replace a larger portion of the piping to provide the room you need for the new fittings.
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Squaw Valley, CA
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    As Jim pointed out, they 'glue' actually 'welds' the two plastics together. The only thing I have found that woirks in the long run (read that as doesn't pop a leak sometime later, DAMHIKT!!) is to just bite the bullet and cut out everything that you can't put a coupling in. You just have to replace all of that stuff.

    To me, it's not worth the chance (probablity!) that it will pop a leak later and cause who knows how much damage before I find it, let alone the agrevation.
    SHERWUD in the beautiful sierra foothills East of Fresno, CA

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Lafayette, OH
    Posts
    348

    repair coupling

    This is the easiest fix:

    http://doitbest.com/shop/product.asp...593&sku=434973

    not an endorsement, just an example ...

    b

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Oak Harbor, Whidbey Island, WA
    Posts
    2,550
    Hi Lee

    In all the plumbing I have done here at the apartment complexes in the last almost 10 years which seem like a bunch, I have found its easier & safer to remove & replace its not that expensive & much nicer to work with clean material.

    If I can give you any more encouragement PM me.
    I usually find it much easier to be wrong once in while than to try to be perfect.

    My web page has a pop up. It is a free site, just close the pop up on the right side of the screen

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Schierer
    Is there a good way, or not so good way, to unglue 1-1/2" pvc drain pipes? I need to make a change to some plumbing and don't have room to add a coupling.
    Lee,

    If it's for a drain, this would work:

    http://www.homedepot.com/prel80/HDUS...&DRC=4&pos=n17

    Pipe & fittings - Transition fittings - 1-1/2" - 1-1/2"x 1-1/2"

    Good Luck,

    Joe

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