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Thread: Basswood tree slices

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Holts Summit, Missouri
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    Basswood tree slices

    Does anybody know where I can buy The thin Basswood tree slices?

    Thanks, Curt

  2. #2
    Walmart carries them in the Crafts Dept. They sell them with the Pen Burning supplies. I haven't found them cheaper anywhere else.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    Sammamish, WA
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    Basswood, or American Linden is hardy to zone 2 and fast growing. Some of you that have space for it might consider planting some. Cut down small ones for coasters, leave the others for the larger slices. Wish I had room for them. I use mostly the boards but will have to check out the prices for slices next time I pass a W/Mart. We actually don't have one within about 20 miles.



    Sammamish, WA

    Epilog Legend 24TT 45W, had a sign business for 17 years, now just doing laser work on the side.

    "One only needs two tools in life: WD-40 to make things go, and duct tape to make them stop." G. Weilacher

    "The handyman's secret weapon - Duct Tape" R. Green

  4. #4
    Curt,

    Try this link......cheapest I have found (cheaper than Wally World). Fast shipping.

    Dennis
    JD Laser Gifts


    http://www.hofcraft.com/walnuthollowbasswoodrounds.html

  5. #5
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    Feb 2006
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    Holts Summit, Missouri
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    Thanks for the leads. I didn't think to check at Walmart for these. Also hadn't heard of Hofcraft before.

    Curt

  6. #6
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    Jun 2006
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    East Central Missouri
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    Hofcraft is very easy to work with and offers great discounts based on your total purchase. I totally recommend them as a supplier.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Holton, Ks
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    Joe,

    You mention making your own. I have thought about this and wondered. I have many cedar trees and some of other types, I would like to make some of my own rounds.

    If I did this, do you know what it would take? Do I need to have a kiln to dry or anyother special equiptment besides a chain saw? Do you cut and then plane and just let dry naturally? I have also been buying these from walmart. I would like to use something a little different in my wood.

    Thanks for any help, I am glad this topic came up.

  8. #8
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    Feb 2005
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    Holton, Ks
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    Does anyone else know where I might find this information?

  9. #9

    Basswood Rounds and Squares

    I purchased a few of these basswood blanks at Walnut Hollow a few years ago. They were very nicely done. I haven't had any of them split or warp. I believe Walnut hollow is in Dodgeville, WI.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    Sammamish, WA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aleta Allen
    Joe,

    You mention making your own. I have thought about this and wondered. I have many cedar trees and some of other types, I would like to make some of my own rounds.

    If I did this, do you know what it would take? Do I need to have a kiln to dry or anyother special equiptment besides a chain saw? Do you cut and then plane and just let dry naturally? I have also been buying these from walmart. I would like to use something a little different in my wood.

    Thanks for any help, I am glad this topic came up.
    Sorry, haven't checked this thread lately. I have no space to plant my own tree farm, but have done some slicing on the band saw with rounds from trees we have cut down, like alders. In a month or two I plan to cut down a 6" diameter cherry. As far as I know you should seal the ends and let it dry close to a year in a dry place out of the sun before slicing, if you cut it up first (wet) it will crack. The experts on this are probably not as likely to check the laser forum. With a chain saw the cuts are rough and would require more sanding, plus it's hard to make the slices even. With the band saw you put a guide on the table for uniform thickness. With cedar you can actually sell things for outdoors and they will hold up pretty well compared to other woods.



    Sammamish, WA

    Epilog Legend 24TT 45W, had a sign business for 17 years, now just doing laser work on the side.

    "One only needs two tools in life: WD-40 to make things go, and duct tape to make them stop." G. Weilacher

    "The handyman's secret weapon - Duct Tape" R. Green

  11. #11
    Join Date
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    Lake Stevens, WA
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    I've home dried wood for turning in the past, and the best way to make it dry slowly for the first 6 months or so is to seal the ends with a light coat of spray paint (great way to get rid of that last fee drops in the can) and then store horizontally. If you pre-cut the blank rounds, store them in boxes of shavings until they dry out sufficiently.

    I used to like poking through firewood piles for odd burls and planks. Always a great resource.

  12. #12
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    Feb 2005
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    Holton, Ks
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    Mike and Joe,

    THANKS! That is exactly the type of information I was looking for. I had not thought of doing that with the sealing ends now and cut later. I cut a few rounds yesterday, so will be able to try both ways now. I will print these off and let my husband read them also. I didn't realize it would take so long for them to dry! I guess I will have to work ahead on this.

    Thanks again for answering.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    Eugene, Oregon
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Hood
    I used to like poking through firewood piles for odd burls and planks. Always a great resource.
    My neighbor found out I do woodwork and told me his dad has some maple "firewood" that I might be interested in. We went to go look at it and what I found was about 2 cords of the most beautiful curly maple I have ever seen. Unfortunately it is all cut to about 18" in length. I have resawn a few pieces and made some nice boxes and such. It's amazing what people have in their wood pile.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    S W NY Killbuck
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    286

    Basswood tree slices

    This is very interesting and a subject close to my heart. All the people that I know that are up close and personal with wood seem to agree that air dried wood is much preferred over kiln dried wood. The rule of thumb for air drying is to allow one year for each inch in thickness. A lot of people seal the ends with bees-wax. If you don't have bees, a good source for bees-wax is a toilet ring. Get it hot and smear the ends liberaly. As it hardens, you get a good seal. May need to be repeated as the wood shrinks. This is old school and the new finishes would probably do as well. Keep the wood sheltered to minimize drastic changes in temp and humidity. Wood reacts to changes in temperature and humidity so consistency is desired. The more uniform the drying, the less chance of the bark separating. I had some really nice applewood pieces from a tree I cut down about 20 years ago. I saved 6" dia pieces and when they were dry I sliced them on my 14" mitre saw with a good blade and they cut so smooth I didn't even have to sand them. So my advice is to be patient. The wait will be worth it. Breaks my heart that the loggers around here cut down basswood trees (sub-species of poplar) just to get them out of the way. They leave them lie and waste because mills won't pay enough to justify their effort. FWIW.

  15. #15
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    I just got back from WalMart and they have the basswood rounds cheaper than the website mentioned above. I bought the WH5507 and it was 3.87 vs 4.17 at hofcraft.com. fyi

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