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Thread: Rub N Buff

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    Hayes, Virginia
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    10,251

    Rub N Buff

    Anyone have any tricks or tips for using Rub n Buff?

    I noticed that it really needs to be mixed before you use it or it is very thin, not an easy task for a product in a tube.

    I just started using Rub n Buff on clear acrylic and will try it on Corian this evening. Any help would be appreciated.

    TIA,
    Keith

    .

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Colorado Springs
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    164
    Fortunately I have never had any that was thin. It usually comes out of the tube with a good paste-like consistency. I have used a lot of it on glass and acrylic. Sometines, if you are not quick enough, it starts to dry and leave a colored sheen on glass or acrylic. I just wipe with a rag and alcohol. If I keep the rag wrapped firmly on my finger it does not take it out of the engraving. The stuff has been discussed widely on www.cuttingedgesandcarving.com
    There is a lady named Karen over there that has vast experience, and does some real neat stuff with it on her sandcarvings.
    Goog luck,
    Bob

  3. #3
    Keith

    A couple of years ago I tried to locate a particular color and called the plant in Indianapolis. The item I wanted was discontinued but in the conversation they told me that mineral spirits was a solvent for all of it.
    Mike Null

    St. Louis Laser, Inc.

    Trotec Speedy 300 Newing Hall 350 Hot Stamping
    Woodworking shop CLTT and Laser Sublimation Sand Carving Graphtec CE5000-60
    Evolis Card Printer
    CorelDraw X5 , Engravlab

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    S W NY Killbuck
    Posts
    286

    Rub N Buff

    Keith; the last time I used RubNBuff it was in a lead like tube like oil paints. Sounds like your stuff separated in the tube. You can knead the tube and mix it up. If it's pretty stiff, you can soak the tube in warm water to make it more pliable.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    New Orleans LA
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    1,335

    Don't Know anything about Rubb n Buff,

    But that won't stop me from commenting. A friend's headlight lenses were crazed to the point of being completly non-transparent. Using Menzerna 2L with a Surfbuf pad on a ROS we polished them up so they were like new. Much better than spending $500 fur a pair of new ones from Chrysler. I guess they are acrylic, aren't they? BTW those materials are available fro Homestead Finishing.
    Last edited by Carl Eyman; 12-09-2006 at 5:32 PM.
    18th century nut --- Carl

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Innisfil Ontario Canada
    Posts
    3,910
    Will Rub n Buff on glass survive the dishwasher?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    East Central Missouri
    Posts
    553
    I use rub 'n buff on some of my engravings, and have found that it is not washable. I clean my product by wiping with slightly damp cloth so as to not remove the coloring.

    As far as the thin thing, I have found that warming the tube in my hand then shaking vigorously helps some. Gently squeezing the tube can help to mix the paste.

    Good luck everyone!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hayes, Virginia
    Posts
    10,251
    Thanks to all for your input. I expect that shaking after warming the tubes will be helpful.

    I didn't expect Rub N Buff to be dishwasher safe, I expect it is more in line with paint as far as durability. For interior signs I expect it is another option for adding color to Corian, acrylic, glass and wood. I have had some success using it on a few Christmas ornaments and clear acrylic business cards and like the fact that it is easy and fast to apply.

    My next task is to learn to apply gold leaf. I recently purchased a small starter pack of sheets, adhesive and sealer. Now to fetch a potato from the kitchen and make my first attempt. Applying gold leaf to raised letters seems to be in every signmakers future.

    .

  9. I use Rubb N Buff on some of the mugs we make and bottles. I have a few mugs that have lasted 2 years in the dishwasher. I have found that the silver seems to last the longest out of any of the colors. The other colors don;t seem to work as well for coverage visibillity.

    Just my $.02

    Wil
    Epilog EXT36 60w, Corel 12, Adobe CS3, ArtCAM Pro 2010, Techno LC4896

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada
    Posts
    103

    Not having any success with Run n Buff

    Ironically, as I now type my wife sits beside me color filling a wooden pen set that we just engraved. Once again we tried rub n buff but it did not work as well as the gold acrylic paint - the type used by tole painters. Although we have only engraved a few pen sets that require the color fill we seem to have a lot better success with the less expensive acrylic paint than run n buff-plus the toxic fumes from the rub n buff are a lot more than the acrylic.
    Pat
    JOMA Engraving, Epilog Helix 35 Watt, Corel X3

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hayes, Virginia
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    10,251
    Well I solved the mixing problem using an inexpensive plastic rock tumbler. Placing a tube or tubes of Rub N Buff or even Cermark bottles in the tumbler canister with soft shipping foam to keep them from banging around gets me a nice smooth rotation. I can plug it in and let it go for an hour which provides plenty of mixing rotations and I don't have to shake the dang things

    .

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    East Central Missouri
    Posts
    553

    So is it now tumble 'n buff?

    Never thought of that solution, Keith! And I have a rock tumbler or two around here!

    Leigh

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hayes, Virginia
    Posts
    10,251
    Leigh,

    I have been using the rock tumbler to mix Rub N Buff and Cermark for a couple days now. It works well and does a better job than manually shaking the tubes and bottles. I have to plan ahead an hour or so but that isn't a problem.

    .

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Rio Rancho, NM
    Posts
    2,564
    I read somewhere on another forum that Rub n Buff, fresh from the manufacturer, is supposed to be relatively thin coming out of the tube, but that it thickens up rapidly after the tube is opened. Apparently enough air comes through the crimps at the bottom of the tube that the stuff can thicken just sitting on the retailer's shelves. After a not-very-long time, the stuff hardens and becomes unusable. Sounds like Keith found the solution. I don't use the stuff, but I'm going to keep this thread for future reference in case I have occasion to do so.

    Nancy
    Nancy Laird
    Owner - D&N Specialties, Rio Rancho, New Mexico
    Woodworker, turner, laser engraver; RETIRED!
    Lasers - ULS M-20 (20W) & M-360 (40W), Corel X4 and X3
    SMC is user supported. http://www.sawmillcreek.org/donate.php
    ___________________________
    It's nice to be important, but it's more important to be nice.

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