Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 22

Thread: Eye Protection with RX built in

  1. #1

    Eye Protection with RX built in

    I am unfortuantely an eyeglass wearer and have been for over 30 years. I force myself to put on my protective goggles over my regular eyeglasses when using the router, table saw, etc. I hate those things. I would like to find some kind of eye protection with the RX built in the lenses. I would just wear these anytime I am in the shop and would prevent my searching for the darned goggles - but I am not looking some kind of huge RX goggles. Am hoping for something a bit more stylish. I got to thinking about a product some of you may know about - "RecSpecs". These are protective eyewear designed for sports such as racquetball and the like. I wonder if they would suffice for woodworking. Anyone know? Anyone have other ideas?
    Regards,

    Glen

    Woodworking: It's a joinery.

  2. Try www.heavyglare.com . I bought some Eye Armor safety glasses that fit over my regular glasses, and these have been very comfortable. They also have frames that can be fitted with RX lenses.
    Rob Millard

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Griswold Connecticut
    Posts
    4,150
    Glen.
    Your optician can make you a pair of safety glasses with an Rx built in. They meet all of the OSHA standards and can even be had in Progressive/tri focal Rx's. These are standard sized glasses. The El Cheapo versions are just slightly larger that a cheap sunglasses.
    We have safety glasses here at work that have an RX built into them. They aren't very expensive $10-12 bucks, of course you probably get $10-12 bucks of quality also.
    I think our friend Tyler would be able to provide more info. Hopefully he see this.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Chagrin Falls, OH
    Posts
    1,641
    Try WileyX. They have all the latest safety certs. I have a pair for work. http://wileyx.com/ I have the Romer II.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Mpls, Minn
    Posts
    2,882


    These are all manufacturs that sell safety glasses, maybe try a shooting forum and see who like what.
    I get mine at work, but most of the shooters I shoot with are pretty knowledgable about safety glasses.


    Decot
    Knobloch
    Oakley
    Randolph Ranger
    Tasco
    Wiley-X
    Zeiss

    Al

  6. #6
    Thanks Al. What makes these "safety" glasses? As I understand it, anything I would buy (with woodworking in mind) would have a polycarboante lens. If the safety glasses you referenced have polycarb lenses, since I can get this type of lens at my local optician, then the only difference is in the protection the frames themselves offer. As woodworkers, we are looking for something that protects us on the sides as well as directly in front of our eyes. This can be had with a wrap-around configuration like the Recpecs or can be obtained from frames that facilitate clip-on side protection pieces. As such, what would be the difference between the safety glasses you referenced and frames that offer some type of side protection along with polycarboante lenses?
    Regards,

    Glen

    Woodworking: It's a joinery.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    672
    Hi Glen,
    I recommend the Orascoptic Research 4.0 tilt-ups!! But seriously now, I use a full face shield that allows use of your conventional glasses and protects all the other pretty parts, like those centrals you had avatar'd previously. Happy Holidays, JCB.

    P.S.: Most glasses are made with shatter resistent lenses now.

  8. #8
    http://www.rx-safety.com/

    They'll send you frames to try on before they fill your RX. They were much cheaper than my local optomitrist - even if I supplied the frames & just had them do the lense work.

    Regarding protection there is a spec ANSI Z87.1-2003 that covers how well they need to protect your eyes - (wrap around design or side shields etc).
    Dewey

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by John Bush
    Hi Glen,
    I recommend the Orascoptic Research 4.0 tilt-ups!!
    Got em already...with the Zeon light too.
    Regards,

    Glen

    Woodworking: It's a joinery.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Mpls, Minn
    Posts
    2,882
    I'm a newbie at woodworking, but been shooting for over 40 years, and I can say imho that woodworking has pretty much the same problem as shooting, objects can come from any direction.

    If you wear a face shield, then the basic eyeglass with the side Shields would probably work fine, if your like me (and I know I am) you don't always wear the added shield, and you need all the safety you can get.

    Other posts have mention spending thousands on safety saws and DC, spend a hundred or what ever it takes to get a top notch wraparound set that encloses the eyes completely.

    And that would be the the shooter style of glasses, I used to wear the side Shields and had a piece of brass sneak by, luckily no damaged was done, but I threw those glasses away.

    Plus, a good set of shooting glasses will feel more comfortable and resist fogging.

    Stop and close one eye, then think about how much its worth to spend on keeping your sight.

    Only my thoughts, fwiw.

    Al

  11. #11
    Take your prescription to any optician and ask fo safety glasses with side shields. The y will have polycoarbonate lenses so wash them iwth warm soapy water never wipe them when dry or they will scratch. I don't know if the discount lense places can make them or not. These will protect your eyes the same as goggles and will have the same clarity you have in your regular glasses. I think the cost will be a bit more than $12 though. You can get a variety of frames for them.
    Lee Schierer - McKean, PA

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Contribute

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Schierer
    Take your prescription to any optician and ask fo safety glasses with side shields. The y will have polycoarbonate lenses
    That is what I was thinking of doing, but I am wondering if it is sufficient (in regards to the material for the lenses (polycarb) as well as the peripheral protection they would offer).
    Regards,

    Glen

    Woodworking: It's a joinery.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Castle Rock, CO
    Posts
    46
    I recently had a pair of Rx safety glasses made at Lenscrafters for my new prescription. They have polycarbonate lenses and removable side shields. They are wire frame and don't look all that different from my normal glasses but are a little heavier. There were a variety of frame styles to choose from. I got lined bifocals but progressive lenses were available at a significantly higher price. As far as I know, these conform to the current safety requirements.

    Dan Thompson

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Columbia, SC
    Posts
    702
    Quote Originally Posted by Glen Blanchard
    That is what I was thinking of doing, but I am wondering if it is sufficient (in regards to the material for the lenses (polycarb) as well as the peripheral protection they would offer).
    Glen,

    I think your local optitian will have products that are specifically designed to be safety glasses, not just regualr glasses with polycarbonate lenses. I've looked at some at my optitian's shop and they are clearly designed to be safety glasses.

    My $.02

    Hank

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Indianapolis
    Posts
    1,430
    I have no line bifocals with side shields, polycarbonate lens and safety frames that I got from the optical dept. at Sam's Club. I took in my RX and picked up the safety glasses in less than a week. Sam's was less than half of what my ophthalmologist wanted. Love them.
    ________
    Ron

    "Individual commitment to a group effort--that is what makes a team work, a company work, a society work, a civilization work."
    Vince Lombardi

Similar Threads

  1. Pole barn versus stick built for shop?
    By Brian Elfert in forum WorkShops
    Replies: 46
    Last Post: 04-24-2008, 8:35 AM
  2. Built in Cabinet and unlevel ceiling
    By Kent Belasco in forum General Woodworking and Power Tools
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 10-20-2006, 10:09 AM
  3. The Importance of Eye Protection...
    By Art Mulder in forum General Woodworking and Power Tools
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 09-20-2006, 3:31 PM
  4. Hearing Protection
    By Tom Jones III in forum General Woodworking and Power Tools
    Replies: 47
    Last Post: 06-30-2005, 2:56 PM
  5. Has anyone built the mission style sewing cabinet from Rockler?
    By Silas Smith in forum General Woodworking and Power Tools
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 02-02-2005, 10:55 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •