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Thread: PVC trim boards - tell me about glueing

  1. #1

    PVC trim boards - tell me about glueing

    I need to replace some 1 x 6 pine trim boards on the mansion. I would like to use some of the new PVC boards so I never have to paint or worry about rot again. But the lengths commonly available in my area are not evenly divisible by the length of my trim. I know these can be corner glued for a nice tight weather resistant seam. Is it practical (feasible, reasonable) to end glue the cutoffs to form another board?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Sicklerville, New Jersey
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    2

    Me Too

    I would like to know that too. I want to do the same thing at my house. I spoke to 3 different people at Lowes about it and got 3 different answers. One guy told me you need a special PVC glue. I didn't know there was a special PVC glue. As far as painting is concerned, the paint "expert" at Lowes said if the boards are outside the paint on them would weather the same as paint on wood boards but you wouldn't have to worry about rot. The only way they would be "maintenance-free" would be if you left them unpainted (white).

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Kanasas City, MO
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    1,787

    Plastic Trim

    I used some PVC brick molding (around screen doors) and also trimmed around a window I bumped out last fall on my total exterior remodel.
    It nails-screws well, cuts well (but stinks when cutting). I also used some 2" X 2" PVC stock & ripped & routed it to make a couple accesory trim pieces. With hardi plank siding, I figured it would be silly to use trim that wouldn't live as long as the siding.
    I painted it all even though it's white from the BORG, my trim color was is shade of white not the bright white. Going on 8 months of exposure to the weather here in the smack dab middle of the mid-west... it's held up so far. No evidence of the paint wanting to let go of the PVC.
    I primed it all first in hopes to help the paint stay put & so far so good. The summer here will be the other true test. 100 degrees & 90% humidity is not umcommon. After 8 years here, I just can't get used to that weather.

    By the way, a mitered butt joint is easily hidden as I have a couple of them in a few places after having some mental diarrhea on a couple of cuts. Caulk it and a couple small trim nails & good to go.

    $0.02 for nadda.
    Greg

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Kalamazoo, MI
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    779
    I bought some AZEK stuff from a real local lumberyard, and because I haven't bought any FESTOOL items, I could afford the genuine AZEK adhesive @ $10.05 for a tiny can. I plan on using pocket hole screws and the primo $$ adhesive and see what happens.
    Kyle in K'zoo
    Screws are kinda like knots, if you can't use the right one, use lots of 'em.
    The greatest tragedy in life is the gruesome murder of a beautiful theory by a brutal gang of facts.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    State Capital, WI
    Posts
    470
    It glues well - really it is a solvent weld - and I have used it to create longer trim boards on my in-laws cottage in the northwoods. The glue is available at our Menard's and at local lumber yards. Off hand, I do not remember the name of the glue used. $0.02 - Rob
    oops ....1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10 - yup all there, whew!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Cape Cod, Ma
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    762
    Being PVC, would not the adhesive/solvent used on PVC plumbing work? I have no experience with it,just curious.

    Lou
    Procrastination.......

    Maybe I'll think about that tomorrow

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Los Angeles, Calif.
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    1,992
    PVC cement like the plumbers use sets up too fast. AZEK (and similar brand) cements are water-based and allow more open time.

    AZEK boards come in 16' lengths up to 12" wide. Similar brand names include Kleer, Koma, etc. Home Depot stocks a brand called "Tuff-Board." I've used it and it works fine. It's also cheaper than the stuff at the lumberyards. However, the face is very smooth--a little too smooth for me. I like something with a little "tooth" to hold the paint better. You can scuff it up with sandpaper, however.

    JW

    Quote Originally Posted by Lou Morrissette View Post
    Being PVC, would not the adhesive/solvent used on PVC plumbing work? I have no experience with it,just curious.

    Lou

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairfield County, CT
    Posts
    958
    I trimmed my whole house with the stuff and it is really a workable material. I used SS nails and was able to find corner boards with metal clips that get covered by the siding so there are no visible fasteners. I have not painted any of it after almost 2 years and all the joints are still tight. I made the cornice, window trims/crowns, 1 x 12 water table, and the entry all in plastic.

    The best thing I did with it so far was to make some 5 1/8" boards towrap a 4x4 using the lock miter joint at the corners. Gled up 3 in the shop and added the 4th in the field and it sure is nice with no visible joints and no paint required. It machines really well since it has no grain and is about the density of clear pine.

    My windows will eventually get painted to cover the nail holes but not the corner boards or cornice as the nails are mostly not visible and are too high to see anyway. There is a new filler called Bond & Fill that might eliminate the need to paint if it is invisible. We'll see.

    Pipe glue works fine but is hard to clean up if you are not painting.The glue cleans up with wet rag but must be done immediately and I find it helps to wipe with cleaner like fantasic soon after glue up to really get it all off.

    THere are all sorts of moldings available in the stuff and the Kleer product I use comes 16' for the 3/4 and 20' for the 1". Google them and see.

    The hardest thing to get used to is the thickness variations. I have seen as much as 1/16" on the 3/4" thick boards but the power plane makes quick work (plane the back of the board). I have some scarf joints in the 1x12 water table that are nearly invisible and still tight after 2 summers and a winter.

    See bad pics here. http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?t=48167.

    Hope that helps

    Ben
    Strive for perfection...Settle for completion

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Grunow View Post
    I have some scarf joints in the 1x12 water table that are nearly invisible and still tight after 2 summers and a winter.

    Hope that helps

    Ben

    Thanks Ben. If your scarf joints on 1 x 12 are still holding, then I guess I'm safe making some scarf joints on my 1 x 6. It's just trim but I would like to do it only once.

    Now to find some Azek glue. Jason, thanks for pointing out the variation in set time, I had not heard of that before.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Los Angeles, Calif.
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    1,992
    If I'm not mistaken, the "Gorilla" PVC glue is also water-based. I've seen lots of trim guys using it.

    JW

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim N Maine View Post
    Thanks Ben. If your scarf joints on 1 x 12 are still holding, then I guess I'm safe making some scarf joints on my 1 x 6. It's just trim but I would like to do it only once.

    Now to find some Azek glue. Jason, thanks for pointing out the variation in set time, I had not heard of that before.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Oliver Springs, TN
    Posts
    233
    I trimmed all my doors and windows with pvc trim. I used regular pvc pipe cement from the lumber yard. I used pocket hole screws to pull the joints closed. I did a couple test pieces first and the pvc failed before the glue joint. You need to be quick with the clamping however. I also used a couple cutoffs to "extend" a board that somehow got cut a little short. I also used stainless screws and plugged the holes with pvc bungs.
    Last edited by John Daugherty; 05-03-2007 at 4:44 PM.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Some where between Buffalo and Rochester NY
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    470
    Check out NYW, norm used this stuff when he built a shed. The glue is simalir to regular pipe glue but it has a longer open time and different holding strenght. I would just buy the glue that is meant for it. This way there are no problems down the road.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairfield County, CT
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    958
    One more thought on the glueing. Make sure the joint is wet with the glue (fill the pores of one board so there is good squeeze out) or the bond will not be as good as it can be. Glue starved joints definitely show up.
    Strive for perfection...Settle for completion

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