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Thread: Attaching glass to cabinet doors

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    95

    Attaching glass to cabinet doors

    Ok it is time to install the glass onto my cabinet doors.
    I would like to buy/build something that will keep the glass from moving and rattling.
    I stop by a furniture place and all the glass door cabinets a saw where installed using some sort of plastic retainer, I tryied shaken it a bit and it did not rattle.

    Does any one know where can I buy this plastic?

    Other options, the company that supplied the glass said they can installed them using silicone (not to convinced but I can be persuaded)
    Another option is using a 1/4 round over wood strips but I have the feeling it will rattle, the last option I can think of is using glass retainers, but again would it rattle.

    This doors are going into an entertainment center and since there is going to be sound I don't want the sound to rattle the glass on the doors.

    Any help as always will be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Rio Rancho, NM
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    2,564
    Luis, you can purchase the plastic retainers at Woodworker's Supply - they come in packages of 100(?). You can also think about installing some "blumotion" door closers so the doors won't bang when you close them. Also, don't forget about the rubber/plastic "bumpers" for the corners of the doors. Keeps the glass from rattling and cracking. DAMHIKT!

    Nancy
    Nancy Laird
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  3. #3
    Rockler also sells a couple of different types...

    http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?O...Select=Details
    http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?O...Select=Details
    http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?O...Select=Details

    or Woodcraft ...

    http://woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyid=1078

    There is a remote possibility you'll find them at a large home center (Home Depot or Lowes), better might be a smaller hardware store. The Ace close to me has a pretty good hardware collection (although I'd guess they are even more expensive than Rockler or Woodcraft).
    Dan

    There are three ways to get something done: Do it yourself, employ someone, or forbid your children to do it.
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  4. #4
    I've used the Rockler type (don't remember if they were Rockler's but same shape). No problems. Just get the profile that will assure tension on the glass based on your inset, etc.
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    37,924
    I like to use small quarter round that I make on the router table/table saw and then just use pin nails to fasten it in. It looks far better than the plastic retainers...a much more finished look...yet retains the ability to be removed should a repair/replacement of the glass be necessary.
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Suwanee (near Atlanta), GA
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    747
    We have a kitchen cabinet that the builder used silicon caulk to hold the class. It is a cabinet that does not get heavey use but it has held up fine for 7 years. Seems to work.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Peace View Post
    We have a kitchen cabinet that the builder used silicon caulk to hold the class. It is a cabinet that does not get heavey use but it has held up fine for 7 years. Seems to work.
    I guy a bought glass from said thats what he does. Says if the glass breaks or you need to repair it you can just cut the silicon and peel it off and then re-do it after you replace the glass. Says it holds the glass in there real well.

  8. #8

    Combine what Jim and Mike did......

    use some quarter round (finished like the rest of the piece) and attached with clear silicone caulk.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    535

    Smile I have been using silicone caulk

    I have used the clear silicone caulk on several projects, never had a problem. I got that suggestion from the glass shop where I purchased glass and mirror. They had items in display installed in this same manner.

    However, I agree that quarter round will provide a better look if that is important for you.

  10. #10
    For kitchen type cabinets, clear silicon is the way to go. Be sure all finish is applied first, and don't get too messy. Lay your door flat put a bead of caulk on the inside, and set the glass. If done correctly the caulk will smoothly squish to the edge of the glass on the back and the edge of the moulding in on the front. I actually smooth out the back with my finger--lubricated with mineral spirits. DON'T mess with the front, let it be, and cut of the bead after it dries with a razor blade.

    For bigger applications, like an actual door, I recently used a thick urethane, or butyl, caulk based on the recommendation of the glass dealer. This is THICK stuff--like what they use on your car windshield, so you'll need a good caulk gun. I happen to have a caulk gun designed for thick stuff which I use for everything, so it was no problem. This is a good way to go for big pieces of glass (tempered of course).

    Whatever caulk used, it will keep things from rattling. Then, if desired, you can dress up the inside of door with some moulding (which I did on the big doors).

    Fred

  11. I use little strips of wood, predrilled for brads. Put a tad of glazing compond on surfaces facing the glass and install very carefully.

    You wind up with a kind of flexible installation that looks good and is very traditional.

    I generally believe that the way the old guys did is best and avoid the newer materials.

    But then you ought to hear me on other topics.

    Good luck!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Fort Smith, Arkansas
    Posts
    1,015

    Thumbs down Am I going to have a problem doing it this way

    Timely question. I am installing my glass now. I have been simply putting the glass into the frames and applying a bead of silicon around the back of the glass and onto the side of the rabbit the glass sits in. I'm not setting the glass into the silicon. Am I going to have problems? The one door I have done seems okay but sure don't want the glass to fall out.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Raymond View Post
    I use little strips of wood, predrilled for brads. Put a tad of glazing compond on surfaces facing the glass and install very carefully.

    You wind up with a kind of flexible installation that looks good and is very traditional. I generally believe that the way the old guys did is best and avoid the newer materials.
    That was the third option I was going to mention But I haven't done it yet. An architect friend of mine recommended it, including filling in the gap between the edge of the glass and the side of the rabbet with the putty as well.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    535

    Thumbs up Set glass first then apply silicone

    I have been doing it this way with no problems.


    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Weber View Post
    Timely question. I am installing my glass now. I have been simply putting the glass into the frames and applying a bead of silicon around the back of the glass and onto the side of the rabbit the glass sits in. I'm not setting the glass into the silicon. Am I going to have problems? The one door I have done seems okay but sure don't want the glass to fall out.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Biddeford Maine
    Posts
    119

    Glass Panels in doors

    I used both small beads of silicon with 1/4 round retainer and no rattles at all on 16 small glass panels in two cabinet doors,

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