Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 23

Thread: Chainsaw sharpening problem

  1. #1

    Chainsaw sharpening problem

    Have been sharpening my Stihl chain saw for a number of years, but have a problem now that I cannot solve. Recently, the saw slices to the left and getting worse [not a golfer, so don't know if left is really a slice ] after starting a perpendicular cut through a log. I have not changed the sharpening method and use a file, with a final touch by a rotary stone the same size as the file. The slice is so drastic that a cut through a 14-inch log results in a 45 degree cut at the bottom . Thought someone might have experienced this problem and have a solution so I don't have to take to professional or dealer.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Mtl, Canada
    Posts
    1,767
    Maybe the bar or chain is worn out causing the teeth to lean in a certain direction?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Southwest VA
    Posts
    222
    sounds like the right teeth and the left teeth are different sizes from wear and sharpening. when did you last get a new chain? I think the bar is probably fine.

  4. #4
    Check your bar. The groove may be way wide at the top, not holding the chain properly.
    Also check your tooth length from one side to another. You may have gradually filed more off one side more than the other.

    Bars can be reground and the groove closed back up.
    But finding someone in your area to do that may/may not be a problem.
    Best is to just buy a new bar/chain combo.
    Last edited by Steve Clardy; 11-28-2007 at 1:38 PM. Reason: fergot a word


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Rutherford Co., NC
    Posts
    792

    NOT the voice of experience...

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Barnett View Post
    Have been sharpening my Stihl chain saw for a number of years, but have a problem now that I cannot solve. Recently, the saw slices to the left and getting worse [not a golfer, so don't know if left is really a slice ] after starting a perpendicular cut through a log. I have not changed the sharpening method and use a file, with a final touch by a rotary stone the same size as the file. The slice is so drastic that a cut through a 14-inch log results in a 45 degree cut at the bottom . Thought someone might have experienced this problem and have a solution so I don't have to take to professional or dealer.
    This has never happened to me, so I'm no voice of experience, but two things come to mind:
    1) Are you somehow NOT getting the teeth on the right side of the chain sharp? If the teeth on the left side bite and the teeth to the right don't that would make it move to the left, I imagine.
    2) Is your bar straight? I would think if it weren't your issue would be the chain skipping off, but if there's a twist in the bar it might cause a tracking problem.
    "Live like no one else, so later, you can LIVE LIKE NO ONE ELSE!"
    - Dave Ramsey

  6. #6
    Most likely it is the chain. You sharpened one side more than the other. They need to be the same length or it will "pull". A bent bar will bind vs. pull. I'm having trouble envisioning how a bar would wear to one side vs another, but you can resquare the bar using a file clamped to a right angle fixture (could be a block of wood).

    Have the chain professionally sharpened (their machine fixtures the chain such that the teeth are the same length/height), or buy a new one.

    A Stihl bar runs ~$50+ depending on model.
    Dewey

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Longview, Washington
    Posts
    91
    different length of teeth would be my guess, doubt it is the bar. but i'm sure somebody will say i'm wrong, even though i ran one 5 days a week for 10 years!!!!! (logging)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    23

    Flip the bar over

    It is usually symmetrical and solves the problem once

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Pottsboro TX
    Posts
    119
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Brault View Post
    different length of teeth would be my guess, doubt it is the bar. but i'm sure somebody will say i'm wrong, even though i ran one 5 days a week for 10 years!!!!! (logging)
    Yeah, you are wrong. I have been using a Stihl 019 since 1992. I cut wood for two woodstoves, also trim trees and clear fence rows. I have had chains with some teeth 1/8" longer than the others. I also have had a few missing teeth (from hitting barbwire). Neither makes a difference.

    I also use Oregon solid steel bars without sprockets on the nose.....

  10. #10

    Chainsaw sharpening problem

    This has happened to me on several occasions. One common cause that hasn't been mentioned is uneven wear of the bar rails such that one is higher than the other. Take the bar off and remove the chain and sight down the length of the bar. The difference is usually visible if you're having a problem with curved cuts. You can correct this by clamping the bar into a vise and with a mill-bastard file held at right angles to the bar, file the high side down to be level with the low. Bailey's (www.baileysonline.com) sells a tool (special file holder) that can be used to accurately level out the bar rails. While you're at it, check the depth of the groove to assure that it's deeper than the tangs on the drive links. If the rails are so worn down that the cutters ride above the rails and rock in the groove, which is worn wider than when new could also lead to angled cuts. Another possibility is that the width of the groove has increased because of wear and allows some angle to develop in the cut. I've never tried it, but I understand that there is a tool to pinch the bar groove down to correct it. It's unlikely that uneven sharpening of the teeth if you're experienced in sharpening. Of course, there is always the possibility that it's time for a new bar. It's said that one bar should last through two chains, assuming that lubrication was adequate. If it is time to treat yourself to a new bar/chain set, and check the sprocket for excessive wear while you're at it. Gene Gauss

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Mpls, Minn
    Posts
    2,882
    Can't remember a saw cutting like that, but if it's the bar I'd do a bit of maintenance on it.
    New chain might be easier to check though.

    Bar maintenance for me is usually pretty basic, I'll take a flat file to the edge of the bar if it develops a burr, then I take a piece of steel that a few thou thicker than the blade and insert that into the groove and tap with a hammer closing any flare that may have developed, I've found turning the bar over helps also as one side wears quicker than the other.

    Nothing you'd find in a manual, but it's worked for over 25 years and a few hundred cords of wood.

    Al...who's still waiting for that darn McCulloch to die, so he can buy a good one...
    Remember our vets, they need our help, just like they helped us.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Mills River NC
    Posts
    124
    Your choice, beat your head against the wall, or listen to what Gene Gauss had to say. I would expect any good book on chain saw maintenance would offer the same advice.

  13. #13
    whenever this has happened to me, it has alway been a chain issue.

    here are some reasons from Oregon's website

    1. Uneven top plates can cause a chain to cut crooked. It's important to keep all top plates equal length

    2. Dull cutters damaged by rocks can cause a chain to cut crooked. It's important to remove all damage from cutters prior to cutting. Cutting with a dull chain can accelerate wear to the bar and chain.

    3. Different depth gauge settings from left to right. Keep all depth gauge settings equal from left to right.

    4. Different top-plate angles from left to right. If you sharpen your chain at a 25 setting on your left hand, your right hand cutters should match

    5. A worn guide bar. A badly worn bar cannot be repaired. If your system is cutting crooked and you have narrowed it down to the bar, more than likely the rails, or the inside of the bar, are damaged beyond repair


    I would replace the chain or have it professionally resharpened, if this does not correct things, then take a look at the bar.

    good luck.



    Howie

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Summit County, Ohio
    Posts
    63
    I would recommend taking the bar and chain to a GOOD chainsaw shop and have them regrind your chain and set the depth gauges to the proper heigth. It should be only $10 - $20 depending on bar length. After several sharpenings the depth gauges will be too tall in relation to the cutters.
    Hand sharpening makes it harder to keep the throat of each cutter exactly where it needs to be. Each subsequent sharpening increases the error. I like to take my chainsaws in after a few hand sharpenings and let the shop get everything back to spec using their jigs. That way everything is starting out uniform. After several hand tune-ups you can't help but get some of the cutters different than the others.
    The type of chain affects how critical sharpening is. Is it a full chisel, semi-chisel or safety type chain? A full chisel chain cuts great when sharp but when it starts to dull it almost stops cutting. Proper sharpening is critical for these chains.
    Good luck.

  15. #15
    Chain is a full chisel and the rails look even and OK; there is some sideways tilting movement of the chain but its not unreasonable. Closer inspection with linear calipers indicated a difference between several left and right teeth; further checks showed all left teeth are longer than those on the right side. After reading repetitive discrepancies, I just used the eye balls for a good hard look(sometimes the best tool) and all the teeth on the left side are now noticeably longer and cleaner and sharper than those on the right side. Seems the left side with the sharper teeth is cutting better, thus the slice to the left. Something had to cause this. Have had the bar in a serious bind a few times but I cannot see any deflection; time to take apart again and use the TS as a flat and check it out again. Otherwise, will take to dealer and have them determine why this occured. Could sharpen and even the teeth but might simply happen again.
    Many thanks to all the folks sharing their ideas. Had I looked more closely I could have saved you guys some time...sorry about that. Still must find out why the teeth are not identical...OR EVEN CLOSE. Need to get this fixed....there is a log still waiting .

Similar Threads

  1. Easiest system to sharpen?
    By Craig D Peltier in forum Neanderthal Haven
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 05-26-2007, 3:30 PM
  2. Chainsaw blade sharpening, how often?
    By Dale Gregory in forum Turner's Forum
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 05-02-2007, 9:22 AM
  3. Forum View Cached (Resolved)
    By Frank Pellow in forum Forum Tech Support
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 10-11-2006, 10:45 AM
  4. sharpening chisels
    By Ed Hardin in forum Neanderthal Haven
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 01-10-2005, 5:17 PM
  5. Had the strangest table saw problem last night
    By Mike Schwing in forum General Woodworking and Power Tools
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-01-2003, 4:04 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •