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Thread: 220 Outlets

  1. #1
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    220 Outlets

    I'm adding some wiring to the shop and have a question.

    Today the table saw and jointer share a single 220 outlet and I just swap out the plugs. I'm tired of doing that so I have the following question.

    Can you have two 220 outlets on a single breaker?

    From what I've seen unlike a 110 outlet which has inbound and outbound contacts for stringing outlets together. I've never seen that on a 220 outlet, so if it's not a code violation how do you do it? I'm assuming I would create a small pig tail to feed the first outlet and wire nut the pig tail, the inbound and the outbound wires together in the box, or in a seperate junction box above the outlet.

    Your thoughts are appreciated.

  2. #2
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    In California, code requires each 220 outlet to be on its own deticated circuit. Check with your local electrical codes to make sure, but my assumtion is that it is the same in most places.

  3. #3
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    Code may require that it is only 1 per circuit. I am not familiar with the NEC to say for sure. There are people who are that will answer for sure.

    Don't wire anything that isn't to code at a minimum, remember the NEC is the minimum standards.

    That said, an outlet that has nothing drawing from it just sits there.

    Joe
    For best results, try not to do anything stupid.

    Si vis pacem, para bellum - Vegetius De Rei Militari III (paraphrased)

    "So this is how liberty dies...with thunderous applause." - Padmé Amidala "Star Wars III: The Revenge of the Sith"

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Fulkerson View Post
    In California, code requires each 220 outlet to be on its own deticated circuit. Check with your local electrical codes to make sure, but my assumtion is that it is the same in most places.
    Not an expert, by any means, but isn't that rule subject to circuit size, too? As I (vaguely) recall, a 20A 240v circuit can have more than one receptical on it, for example, but a 30a one cannot. Hopefully a californian electrical inspector could chime in? :P
    Jason Beam
    Sacramento, CA

  5. #5
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    Not sure about CA but I have two 220 outlets on 4 different runs in my shop and the MN inspector signed off on them.

  6. #6
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    You can check out the NEC online for free (www.nfpa.org). I think that it is section 210 that you are looking for of document 70 which is the NEC.
    If I am reading it correctly, there is no requirement that says 1 outlet only with the exception of dryers, ranges, etc. The number of 'taps' depends upon the number of amps the circuit can supply.. For example, a 15 amp circuit can have 14 taps while a 50 amp can only have 12. I highly doubt that california or kansas would deviate from this.
    Also, others may interpret the NEC differently, so read it yourself and check with your local inspectors since they have the ultimate say.

  7. #7
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    Don't know if it's code or not, (our county has no electrical inspection) but I installed some of these:

    Since I only can run one machine at a time, couldn't see where there would be a problem. They can be ordered through any electrical supply house.
    http://www.leviton.com/OA_HTML/ibeCC...&section=10928

  8. #8
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    The NEC rules about Branch Circuits allow multiple receptacles on 15, 20 and even 30 amp circuits. The code section is article 210 - Branch Circuits if you want to read about it.

    On 15 amp circuits, receptacles must be no larger than 15 amp rated.
    On 20 amp circuits, receptacles can be either 15 or 20 amp rated (assuming there is more than 1 outlet).
    On 30 amp circuits, receptacles must be 30 amp rated.


    Rob
    Addy protocol: unlicensed, homeowner electrician

  9. #9
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    Wow, thanks guys.

    I should have the new Dust Gorilla (stealth gloat) running this weekend.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Haycraft View Post
    You can check out the NEC online for free (www.nfpa.org). I think that it is section 210 that you are looking for of document 70 which is the NEC.
    I wasn't aware that the NEC was available online for free. The NFPA is still selling it. Where on their site did you find it available online for free?

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Haycraft View Post
    If I am reading it correctly, there is no requirement that says 1 outlet only with the exception of dryers, ranges, etc. The number of 'taps' depends upon the number of amps the circuit can supply.. For example, a 15 amp circuit can have 14 taps while a 50 amp can only have 12. I highly doubt that california or kansas would deviate from this.
    The tap rule is typically a commercial requirement, not a residential one.

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Haycraft View Post
    Also ... check with your local inspectors since they have the ultimate say.
    Totally agree!

    Rob

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Russell View Post
    I wasn't aware that the NEC was available online for free. The NFPA is still selling it. Where on their site did you find it available online for free?
    Go here:
    http://www.nfpa.org/aboutthecodes/Ab....asp?DocNum=70
    Near the bottom are links to view the documents for various years. You can't download or store them, but for the casual user it beats paying 70 bucks.

  12. #12
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    Rob is generally the man with the plan when it comes to the NEC info. Unfortunately before he posted I couldn't recall who it was that answered my question a while ago about a subpanel box.

    CA deviating from the national code wouldn't surprise me at all. There are lots of rules in place in some areas that are much more strict than other areas. Building codes is one example. Some are for good reasons, earthquakes others for other reasons.

    I have several outlets on a 20 amp / 220 for the same reasons. One machine at a time.

    Joe
    For best results, try not to do anything stupid.

    Si vis pacem, para bellum - Vegetius De Rei Militari III (paraphrased)

    "So this is how liberty dies...with thunderous applause." - Padmé Amidala "Star Wars III: The Revenge of the Sith"

  13. There is nothing in the NEC to preclude multiple outlets on a 240 volt circuit. I also highly doubt that California is any different. The reason why this information gets stated is because someone asked a local inspector a question, and the inspector automatically assumes they are asking the common question about appliance outlets, so he gives a default answer. Your dryer and range must be on dedicated circuits, and this is specifically stated in code. Other outlets are not covered by this.

  14. #14
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    Isn't there an NEC rule that states that a motor over a certain hp must have it's own circuit whether it is 110V or 220V?
    -Jeff

  15. #15
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    Off the top of my head, i would say yes, but that would only apply to hard wired equipment and not receptacles.

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