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Thread: Frame Saw for Resawing?

  1. #1
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    Frame Saw for Resawing?

    While saving slowly for a bandsaw, I want to make two frame saws.

    The first will be a 12" turning saw with the plan and blades from Tools For Working Wood.

    I am also in need of resawing a board for my wife's jewelry box and I don't want to put it off waiting for electrical solution. (I know, I could call my friends with bandsaws and get it done with an hour's drive, but what challenge is that?)

    Does anyone have plans and a blade source for a re-sawing frame saw, with the blade in the middle between the supports? Note above, I do not have a bandsaw yet. Hence I don't have any old bandsaw blades to cut up.
    Veni Vidi Vendi Vente! I came, I saw, I bought a large coffee!

  2. #2
    Woodcraft has a 'traditional-type' frame saw on close-out for aroun $40. Hard to beat that. I have one like it and use it at least once a week for resawing:

    http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyid=4608

    Note that depending on the source you're referencing, who you're talking to, etc., the terms 'frame saw' and 'bowsaw' are interchanged a lot, and confusion is added to the picture because different countries, i.e. UK, Gremany, Sweden, sometimes use the same names.

  3. #3
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    veneer or frame saw pics here, http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthre...ghlight=veneer

    get a replacement blade for a Sears or stanley or other new style miter box saw, its a web blade.
    Jr.
    Hand tools are very modern- they are all cordless
    NORMAL is just a setting on the washing machine.
    Be who you are and say what you feel... because those that matter... don't mind...and those that mind...don't matter!
    By Hammer and Hand All Arts Do Stand

  4. #4
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    Sam,

    I have that saw, I have been able to resaw with it, but my technique must not be that good.

    As I mentioned in another post, I don't own any power tools (by circumstance not choice) but this saw and in general resawing makes me wish for a bandsaw which I will likely get once I finish other stuff around my house.

    That said, I do want to learn proper technique, or maybe I just need practice. Any pointers?

    Here's what I currently do.

    1.- Scribe line all around board
    2.- Place board on face vise at about 45 degree angle
    3.- Start resaw cut with backsaw or ryoba following line on both edge and endgrain
    4.- flip board to another corner, until I get as far as possible from all 4 corners
    5.- Finish with frame

    But this gives me poor results, lots of waste.

    Any help appreciated.

    /p

  5. #5
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    Harry, if I were a "web blade", what would I look like?
    Veni Vidi Vendi Vente! I came, I saw, I bought a large coffee!

  6. #6
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    This Never Worked For Me...

    Quote Originally Posted by Pedro Reyes View Post
    Here's what I currently do.

    4.- flip board to another corner, until I get as far as possible from all 4 corners

    But this gives me poor results, lots of waste.
    This technique never worked for me.
    I found once the cut was started, keep going works best.

    From the woodworking display last weekend in Oakland, I also learned a clue from Kevin Glen-Drake. Make your stroke and check the tracking. He said you can correct if only one or two strokes are off, but if you go much further, it is almost impossible to get back to the line. So, make sure of your tracking on each stroke.

    I do think for re-sawing a band saw may be best, a frame saw with a sideways blade may also work well. You do not need a band saw in order to buy a band saw blade.

    One thing I have often thought of is to make a spring pole treadle saw if I ever get a bigger shop.

    jim

  7. #7
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    Whew, Harry, those are some nice-lookin saws, but you've got way too much time on your hands!

    #7 in the pictures looks like a felloe saw, which is what I thought was the knuckle-draggers used for resawing.

  8. #8
    Nice looking saws! What would you use for blade holders if you were making a bow saw like Tage Fride, with the blade that can rotate?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Kent View Post
    Harry, if I were a "web blade", what would I look like?
    Brian, WEB is just an old time term for a saw blade that was stretched between some kind of wooden frame to tension the web/blade and give it stability. A Web can be most any narrow to wide blade of any length. Think of an ordinary hacksaw, it is both a BOW saw and a FRAME saw in the broad sense of things, with a WEB blade stretched between two points. A coping saw falls into this category also.

    In days gone by the woodworkers were just that Workers of Wood. Money was tight (isn't it always) and they could go to any Hardware or General Store and purchase a Web(blade) sellecting one of suitable length, width and tooth configuration for their needs. Why buy a whole saw when they could use what wood was available to and their own skill to make the same thing. Making a frame or bow to hold the web is not rocket science. most anything will do. Even an illiterate person who is handy with their hands can do it.

    Ordinary metal banding material (the usually black colored thin strips of metal used to contain bulky materials makes a decent Web/blade. All it takes is any means available to hold it while you use a small 3 cornered file to cut (file the teeth) in it. They do not even have to be accurately spaced to work. Set (bend every other tooth to the same side) and stretch it between a frame or bow.
    How fast a given web/blade cuts is determined by the spacing (number of teeth per inch) and how wide the set is. Larger teeth have more of a gullet (the space between tooth points) to carry off more swarf(sawdust) from the cut, thus they have a tendency to cut faster. A wider set removes more material and is so doesn't cut as fast, whereas a narrow set does not remove as much material so it has a tendency to cut (depth) faster.

    Narrow blades with a wide set work well for following curves, while wider blades with a narrow set remove less material but tend to follow straight lines better as they can't wobble around in the Kerf.


    James Carmichael -- Whew, Harry, those are some nice-lookin saws, but you've got way too much time on your hands!

    LOL James, you got that right, I am a Blacksmith by trade (55 years as a working smith) until I injured my back and am now permanently disabled. So what is time to me now. I made those saws when I was a working smith with woodworking as a hobby. Really what is the difference in spending a little time making your own tool and buying one (paying someone else ) to make it for you, you will probably spend the same amount of time working at some other job, maybe even one you hate, making the money to pay someone else to have fun making a tool for you. Which is more rewarding, saying I paid John Doe $??.00 to make this tool for me, or saying I made this tool myself for myself. I don't drink, I don't care for so called sports and am not a sports fan, which in reality is usually someone who cannot actually participate in the so called sport, but is a sedintary couch or chair second guesser yelling at some hulking mass of muscle or overly tall kid or grown up who is paid an unbelievable amount of money to do what they do best, chase some kind of ball around so other people can yell at them. I prefer to spend my time making things for my own pleasure.

    Frame Saw, Framed Saw, Felloe Saw, Donkey Saw, Jesus Saw are all names used by different Crafts and or different Nationalities to describe the same tool. What's in a name, its what its used for and how well it works and how adapt a person is at using a tool that makes it work or not work. Frame Saw think of a web (blade) confined inside a frame. Bow Saw, think of a frame with the web (blade) itself being one side of the frame.


    David White II -- Nice looking saws! What would you use for blade holders if you were making a bow saw like Tage Fride, with the blade that can rotate?

    David, I am not familiar with the name Tage Fride, as I do not subscribe to Wood working magazines, so I have no idea what or who you are referring too. I do not try to emulate (hope that's the right word) other people or craftsmen, I am a high school drop out,(couldn't understand English Class) who prefers to do things my own way and make tools that work well for me. I do use old technical manuals (books) to try and learn what the previous generations spent generations learning and perfecting. I don't use other peoples drawings and dimensions and/or layouts for cutting things out and most times don't use their assembly methods, preferring to do things my way with joints and pegs sans screws and or nails. If I were to follow their detailed directions and/or cutting lists and assembly methods I would be copying their work and it wouldn't be my work and skill represented.

    Sorry for the long winded post and hope I didn't step on anybodies toes with my personal views, but, oh well, I am not running for Political Office.

    (The Views expressed above are the Personal Views of the Author and Do Not Represent the Views of the Forum Owners.)
    Last edited by harry strasil; 02-28-2008 at 4:07 AM.
    Jr.
    Hand tools are very modern- they are all cordless
    NORMAL is just a setting on the washing machine.
    Be who you are and say what you feel... because those that matter... don't mind...and those that mind...don't matter!
    By Hammer and Hand All Arts Do Stand

  10. #10
    Pedro,

    Sorry I didn't get back with you sooner. There are a couple things I've found that help tremendously when trying to use a frame saw for ripping. First, double-check the blade and make sure that the set is in fact for ripping. Next, sharpen the blade. I find that if I do this before I start on a set of stock, it greatly improves the cut and helps my shoulders. Next, before I rip the stock, I will cut at least a 1" depth cut on the table saw all the way around the piece. I usually try to go as deep as my blade will allow. The disadvantage in doing this is the loss of stock due to the large kerf. On the positive side, the cut groove makes it immensely easier for the frame saw to stay true through the cut. Plus the advantage that the table saw has removed material that you won't have to remove with your back, shoulders, and the framing saw .

    When I use the saw, I orient the frame saw so that it cuts on the pull stroke. It just seems to work better for me. if you're binding in the cut make sure you have enough set in the teeth. You may have to play with that a bit. When everything is right, you will be amazed that a ripping cut actually goes much faster than a crosscut. Obviously, the harder the material, the harder the effort. Maple is harder to rip cut than cherry, for example.

    Hope this helps.

  11. #11
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    Harry, I really appreciate what you called a long winded response. You answered my question and a couple that I would have asked if I had enough experience to know what to ask. Thank you for taking the time and passing on your fun of the sport of woodworking.

    Brian
    Veni Vidi Vendi Vente! I came, I saw, I bought a large coffee!

  12. Last edited by Michael Hammers; 02-28-2008 at 10:40 AM.
    "Simplicity is at the heart of so much that is fine"
    James Krenov

  13. #13
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    Harry, again, nice looking saws. I made a bow saw and used a cut up band saw blade for the blade.

    Question. Do you use them on the push stroke or pull stroke? I have found they are much easier to use cutting with the pull stroke.
    Life's too short to use old sandpaper.

  14. #14
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    Harry - when David asked about Tage Frid-style saws,

    he was asking about your turning saws. I'm pretty sure he wants to know how you make your blade holders; pinch, pinned, etc.

    David - FWIW, if you go the coping saw route (pinned blades), ToolsForWorkingWood sells the pieces that hold pinned blades and the blades. I've built three of their turning saws using these parts and they work great.
    AKA - "The human termite"

  15. #15
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    Bob, I push them to cut, whenever I tried to pull them all I got was bounce and took forever to cut something. Of course I have strong wrists.

    Chuck I use most anything, some are turned from brass round stock with a ferulle in the middle and threaded on the outside end and I screw them into commercially made wooden file handles with a metal ferrule, on the big rip frame saw I use old hard oak squares with one end having a dowel thru it for a stop and the other square rounded and threaded with a threaded wooden Wing nut, I drill two holes x inches apart and bend a 1/8 steel welding rod to a sharp cornered U to the same specs and then slit the end of the square with a saw, drill a hole in the blade and push the U thru the holder and the blade and it it is inset into the wood so its smooth on the outside, one leg of the U is longer than the other,so it can be removed without tools. The sides of the frame saws are just shoulder mortice and tenoned into the yoke so they fit snug but not tight.

    This picture shows the old method of ripping, using a frame rip saw on the push stroke and a pair of Saw Tables or benches.


    this picture shows me using the veener saw cutting on the push stroke.

    Jr.
    Hand tools are very modern- they are all cordless
    NORMAL is just a setting on the washing machine.
    Be who you are and say what you feel... because those that matter... don't mind...and those that mind...don't matter!
    By Hammer and Hand All Arts Do Stand

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