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Thread: Best Water Proof Glue

  1. #1
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    Best Water Proof Glue

    I'm building some outdoor furniture. The butt joints are held by SS screws,so they won't rely on the glue much for strength.

    I would like the glue to serve as a coating/caulking between the butt joints. The water trapped between a tight butt joint is where I see it rotting the wood. The joints are Redwood battens screwed to the under side of Redwood table tops. Yes, Redwood is rot resistant but some of this has sapwood. The sapwood is only a little more rot resistant than Doug Fir. I've seen many 20 year old Doug Fir picnic tables around here still going strong, so this is probably overkill.

    I'm considering Titebond III or a waterproof construction adhesive.

    Has anyone tested Titebond III for many years of soaking /drying?

    My gut tells me construction adhesive might be best for something like this.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Sounds like a cross grain joint, and I'm not sure ANY glue is a good idea, but if you insist, you might consider 3m 5200.

  3. #3
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    rescorsinal (not spelled correctly) or epoxy are "the" waterproof glues, but I think Joe has the right idea.

  4. #4
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    Based on the way you want to use the "glue" it seems waterproof and gap filling are the two properties you need. Epoxy seems to be the correct answer here.
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  5. #5
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    3M 5200 is a below the waterline marine grade sealant/adhesive. I use it for my boats all the time when bedding fittings there is nothing better. However I am more inclined to recommend epoxy in this case. It is stronger and I believe more UV resistant. Expoy will cure in about 24 hours. 5200 takes up to a week to fully cure. If you do go with the 5200 look at the big orange box. They seem to have the best prices on that item. The marinas, at least by me, are a few $$ more per tube and may not be as fresh.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Marty Paulus View Post
    3M 5200 is a below the waterline marine grade sealant/adhesive. I use it for my boats all the time when bedding fittings there is nothing better. However I am more inclined to recommend epoxy in this case. It is stronger and I believe more UV resistant. Expoy will cure in about 24 hours. 5200 takes up to a week to fully cure. If you do go with the 5200 look at the big orange box. They seem to have the best prices on that item. The marinas, at least by me, are a few $$ more per tube and may not be as fresh.
    Can't believe you can get 5200 at your HD. Must be a geographical thing. I was thinking since the cross grain joint of his table top is prone to cracking, the flexibility of the 5200, along with screws, might give the joint a "fighting chance".

  7. #7
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    It seems to me this topic in a roundabout way came up here not to long ago. There is a test group that has a process to which they grade glue. It seems to me that for the tests they did that TiteBond II actually performed better than the III. But again that is my recollection of the thread. It may have been for the particular application. If I come across it I will repost

    I found this thread in a search it is not the one I remember but it does re-enforce what i previously said many prefer the II unless you are doing difficult glue ups then the III gave you bit more working time. No one mentions the the glue test that determines the rating as I seem to have read somewhere, possibaly McFeely's. the test is quite odd as they boil the wood for a certian time then glue, when cured they boil again again and then break test. Very unorthodox I seem to remember. http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthre...-Glue-question ,

    This is interesting be sure to read the TiteBond II part
    http://www.simplicityboats.com/boil.html
    Last edited by Kevin Presutti; 03-08-2012 at 1:57 PM. Reason: Added Links

  8. #8
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    Here's a test that Bob Smalser did. Be sure to read the entire thing because the immersion test results are posted later in the thread. Anyway, the marine epoxy and Resorcinol (Weldwood, etc.) glues fared the best. I seem to recall that 5200 did not fare well when the wood became saturated with water (post-cure).

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by joe milana View Post
    Sounds like a cross grain joint, and I'm not sure ANY glue is a good idea, but if you insist, you might consider 3m 5200.
    Yes, it's mostly cross grain joints. Flexibility and sealing is what I need.

    I'll test some 3m 5200 or PL Premium Construction Adhesive. Even silicone caulking should work.

    Thanks

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Portland View Post
    Here's a test that Bob Smalser did. Be sure to read the entire thing because the immersion test results are posted later in the thread. Anyway, the marine epoxy and Resorcinol (Weldwood, etc.) glues fared the best. I seem to recall that 5200 did not fare well when the wood became saturated with water (post-cure).
    Thanks Greg,
    In this test by Bob http://www.woodcentral.com/articles/...cles_737.shtml The PL Premium came out OK for my needs.

  11. #11
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    I have used the Resorcinol on some outdoor arches. Stuff is bullet proof. Mix, spread a good coat, clamp, leave for about 24 hrs., and put it to work. This stuff is kinda purple , so doesn't work too well for staining. I painted the arches.
    Bill
    On the other hand, I still have five fingers.

  12. #12
    While the Bob Smalser article provides some good information about the adhesives used, no conclusion can be come to based on his experiment. He states the resorcinal resin fares well with high clamping pressure & temperature, and the 5200 & poly lost adhesion without clamping pressure, but when clamped, remained strong. Does this mean he clamped the joint glued with resorcinal, and not the joints glued with poly or 5200? Did he glue an unclamped sample with the resorcinal, and how did it fair?

    If you re-read the OP, Andrew is looking for something to basically "coat & seal" a cross grain joint that will be screwed (which will provide clamping pressure) as well. I don't believe strength is the primary factor. He also mentions that silicone should work as well. I wonder how the silicone would work in a thin film scenario like that? I have no idea, but am curious.

  13. #13
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    Any type of adhesive in that application seems like overkill. Redwood swells and shrinks and I don't see how placing glue/epoxy/caulk between 2 boards is going to change that. I've built a lot of redwood outdoor structures and haven't noticed rot between adjoining boards being a problem. Make sure you are using galvanized, coated deck, or stainless steel screws.
    Scott Vroom

    If all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

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