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Thread: Starting out with chisels, hand planes, saws, etc...

  1. #46
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hasin Haroon View Post
    Craig, don't rule out a bevel up jack. It'll smooth just as well and also joint. In fact the one thing you might not be able to do at this point with a brand new BU jack is the rough work - you'd have to fiddle with cambering a thick blade to do that.
    If you changed "it will smooth just as well" to "it will smooth well enough to get you up and running" then I'd completely agree.

    Relying on a single iron sacrifices some important options/capabilities for managing tearout in difficult wood, so I don't think you can reasonably argue that it's equal to a double-iron bench plane for smoothing.

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    South West Ontario
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    I would stay away from bevel up planes except a low angle block plane. The blades are so thick you need a grinder to hollow grind them or you spend all your shop time sharpening them. They can work well in some woods but difficult grain can be very frustrating. Chip breakers on planes when properly set up greatly reduce tear out. You will need to hone the parts to fit carefully but once you have they work very well. A bevel up jack can make a decent wide mouth scrub plane, but the blade will still need sharpening.

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Australia
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    2,019
    Our low-angle jack plane is ideal for shooting miters, working end grain, and initial smoothing. http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/Pag...82,41186,49708

  4. #49
    Quote Originally Posted by William Fretwell View Post
    I would stay away from bevel up planes except a low angle block plane. The blades are so thick you need a grinder to hollow grind them or you spend all your shop time sharpening them. They can work well in some woods but difficult grain can be very frustrating.
    Well, I guess we've had different experiences William. I sharpened mine for quite some time without a grinder and didnt take excessively long. Also, mine worked very well on the two sections of 3" x 20" end grain of my butcher block. BU vs BD - to each his own I guess.
    Fred

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Henderson NV (Las Vegas)
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    Well. Today was/is a good day for me I guess. I hear the door bell and open it up and find a package on the doorstep. UPS guys here drop and dash. lol. Low and behold, my girlfriend says, "I saw you looking at them the other day and you left the page on you laptop. Happy early birthday and now go sharpen our knives." lol

    Woooo Hooooo!


  6. #51
    Absolutely awesome, Craig!
    Now go sharpen those knives. Time enough for the wood tools later. Better keep that one happy!

  7. #52
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
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    Dublin, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by William Fretwell View Post
    I would stay away from bevel up planes except a low angle block plane. The blades are so thick you need a grinder to hollow grind them or you spend all your shop time sharpening them. They can work well in some woods but difficult grain can be very frustrating. Chip breakers on planes when properly set up greatly reduce tear out. You will need to hone the parts to fit carefully but once you have they work very well. A bevel up jack can make a decent wide mouth scrub plane, but the blade will still need sharpening.
    This seems overstated in my experience, but then again I hollow-grind :-).

    You can manage tearout in BU planes with a combination of cutting angle (i.e. blade bevel angle) and possibly a tight mouth. IMO the resulting tradeoff space between surface sheen/depth, planing effort, and tearout suppression isn't quite as favorable as you can obtain with a cap iron, which is what I was driving at in my previous comment. With that said, lots of people have done better work than I ever could that way.
    Last edited by Patrick Chase; 07-19-2017 at 6:38 PM.

  8. #53
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    Sep 2016
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    Henderson NV (Las Vegas)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Baker 2 View Post
    Absolutely awesome, Craig!
    Now go sharpen those knives. Time enough for the wood tools later. Better keep that one happy!
    Dont I know it.

    Just like I know there's a "wouldn't some new drapes look good here" coming too.

  9. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by Craig Shewmake View Post
    You are a lucky dude.

  10. #55
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    Dec 2016
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    South West Ontario
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frederick Skelly View Post
    Well, I guess we've had different experiences William. I sharpened mine for quite some time without a grinder and didnt take excessively long. Also, mine worked very well on the two sections of 3" x 20" end grain of my butcher block. BU vs BD - to each his own I guess.
    Fred
    Precisely Fred! They work for a while without a grinder, then you have to have one! Small sections of end grain are not so bad but difficult reversing grain is a different story. Keep using them on various woods and you will get fed up with their faults just like me!

  11. #56
    Quote Originally Posted by Craig Shewmake View Post
    Dont I know it.

    Just like I know there's a "wouldn't some new drapes look good here" coming too.
    Hey, one good turn deserves another!

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