Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 23

Thread: 1/16" strips needed

  1. #1

    1/16" strips needed

    I want to cut 1/16" strips for a project and I need lots of them and in different woods. I want to use my tablesaw for it is the most accurate saw I own. The Bandsaw does not have the right blades. I am looking for a jig of some sort that would be safe to use to cut these strips without having to move the fence after each cut. I have done those that way but the accuracy is just not there. I need dead accuracy. Anyone have a jig they would be willing to share??? Thanks
    John T.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Upland CA
    Posts
    2,664
    I would make a thick push block out of 2x4 with a wooden dowel stuck in it for a handle, and a shoe hanging down the backside. Keep the blade low, and run the push block right over it with the fence at 1/16th. Insert a short splitter (store bought or home made) into the blade insert for added safety.

    Rick Potter

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dickinson, Texas
    Posts
    1,661
    I cut thin strips on the table saw with the strip falling on the side away from the rip fence. This requires adjusting the fence to leave the 1/16" outside of the blade after every cut.

    I have some switchable magnets and will set one to provide the clearance required. You just adjust the fence and wood to rest against the magnet and then using a push block to make the cut.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by lowell holmes View Post
    I cut thin strips on the table saw with the strip falling on the side away from the rip fence. This requires adjusting the fence to leave the 1/16" outside of the blade after every cut.

    I have some switchable magnets and will set one to provide the clearance required. You just adjust the fence and wood to rest against the magnet and then using a push block to make the cut.
    Exactly how I do it. I use a magnetic feather board as the stop.

  5. #5
    I've done it on both sides of the fence.

    I believe it's a misconception that having to move the fence is the less accurate way.

    I do it now by setting my miter gauge's fence 1/16" away from the blade on the left side, then putting my piece up against it, setting the fence, then removing the miter gauge. Repeat for each cut.

    If you still want to do it on the other side, I would do it this way, with a sliding fence:

    http://www.woodmagazine.com/woodwork...p-ripping-jig/

    The only thing I'd change about this jig is to make the 'foot' taller and longer and thicker. This will allow it to project to the left side of the blade and help push the waste side squarely thru the cut.

    If your strips are short, like less than 20" or so, the most accurate and safest way is to use a crosscut sled with a stop block.
    Last edited by Prashun Patel; 03-14-2012 at 11:30 AM.

  6. #6
    Hey, that's slick Prashun.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    So Calif
    Posts
    958
    Prashun, that looks like the best, and safest way of cutting thin strips without moving the fence. I am going to remember that one.

    Sam

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Prashun Patel View Post
    I've done it on both sides of the fence.

    I believe it's a misconception that having to move the fence is the less accurate way.

    I do it now by setting my miter gauge's fence 1/16" away from the blade on the left side, then putting my piece up against it, setting the fence, then removing the miter gauge. Repeat for each cut.

    If you still want to do it on the other side, I would do it this way, with a sliding fence:

    http://www.woodmagazine.com/woodwork...p-ripping-jig/

    The only thing I'd change about this jig is to make the 'foot' taller and longer and thicker. This will allow it to project to the left side of the blade and help push the waste side squarely thru the cut.

    If your strips are short, like less than 20" or so, the most accurate and safest way is to use a crosscut sled with a stop block.

    I like the second version with the added idea of a solid back fence. I think I will try this. Thanks
    John T.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Potter View Post
    I would make a thick push block out of 2x4 with a wooden dowel stuck in it for a handle, and a shoe hanging down the backside. Keep the blade low, and run the push block right over it with the fence at 1/16th. Insert a short splitter (store bought or home made) into the blade insert for added safety.
    Ditto, but I just make these as needed and throw them away after they have a couple of grooves - 30 seconds at the bandsaw with a piece of scrap gives you a fast and safe pusher that lets you power through repetitive ripping like this. 1/16" is so thin that a bigger push block would just be in the way. I just noticed that I need to talk to my employee about blade height!


    JR

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Auburn, ME
    Posts
    713
    Have you thought of a jig like this...

    http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?p...6&site=ROCKLER

    I know you said you don't want to move the fence but this seems to do the trick.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    2,323
    I do the same as Rick and JR, moving the fence just does't make any sense at all to me. Set the fence once, use a zero clearance insert, and you can rip hundreds, if not thousands of those strips safely and without trying to re-invent the wheel.

    good luck,
    JeffD

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Highland MI
    Posts
    1,779
    Blog Entries
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Cuetara View Post
    Have you thought of a jig like this...

    http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?p...6&site=ROCKLER

    I know you said you don't want to move the fence but this seems to do the trick.
    That is what I use.

  13. #13
    Regardless of how you set up your tablesaw--I've done it most ways and seem to using the Rockler jig most of the time now days--you won't end up with smooth surfaces using a tablesaw. If this is important to you then I'd first joint one edge and then cut the strip slightly thick. This will give you a strip with one smooth edge. Next, I use a pretty slick sanding jig called the Luthier's Friend that uses your drill press. Run these through and you'll have perfectly surfaced strips.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Tampa Bay, FL
    Posts
    1,196
    Quote Originally Posted by Ole Anderson View Post
    That is what I use.
    +1, though Prashun's post looks interesting.
    There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness."

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Salomon View Post
    Regardless of how you set up your tablesaw--I've done it most ways and seem to using the Rockler jig most of the time now days--you won't end up with smooth surfaces using a tablesaw. If this is important to you then I'd first joint one edge and then cut the strip slightly thick. This will give you a strip with one smooth edge. Next, I use a pretty slick sanding jig called the Luthier's Friend that uses your drill press. Run these through and you'll have perfectly surfaced strips.
    I don't know about you but the strips I cut are glue ready and with todays saw blades you can get some baby bottom smooth slices. These strips will be used for a herringbone pattern and will have many different woods glued together.

    I want to thank everyone for the suggestions and hopefully I should have no problem with this project now.
    John T.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •